Motorcycle Magazines — Still Cheaper Than A Latte

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

I’m often asked how we decide which articles to publish in this magazine. Non-riders I talk with are amazed that there are enough motorcycle topics for us to fill a magazine this size every four weeks (we publish 13 issues of American Iron Magazine a year) without running out of material. Many riders often request that we publish articles that are of specific interest to them: like only baggers, Softails, Panheads, or whatever they’re into.

In general, here’s the procedure that Chris Maida (the hardest working editor in our business) and I follow on what seems like a weekly basis. As an enthusiast magazine, our job is to educate and entertain you with informative articles in every issue. Because our 100,000-plus readers’ interests cover a broad spectrum of American motor­cycle-related topics, we spread our coverage as widely as possible to give real value to all readers.

Every issue offers American motorcycles. There are new reviews and as many different types of customs as we can fit; you’ll find everything from backyard builds to pro-built customs, plus at least one classic American bike. Those full-feature articles are joined by a list of departments that include three favorites: Reader’s Ride, Snaps, and Letters. And as you’ve probably noticed, those departments are filled with photos of our readers’ bikes. We love to feature your rides, and we encourage you to send your photos to Letters@AmericanIronMag.com and ReadersRide@AmericanIronMag.com so that you can be part of our magazine family.

American Iron Magazine is also filled with informative and factual new bike and product reviews, plus tours and event coverage. Chris then puts together an assortment of tech and how-to articles for our readers, from novice to skilled mechanic, to complete the editorial package.

Our subtitle has been “For People Who Love Harley-Davidsons” since 1989, and most of our editorial is Harley-specific. But we add Indian, Victory, and other American motorcycles because our readers have asked for that.

If you have specific ideas on how we can make American Iron Magazine a better package or if you have comments, please pass them along at Letters@AmericanIronMag.com. We’d like to hear from you.

In addition to American Iron Magazine, we also publish American Iron Garage, a tech and DIY publication. AIG has no tours, events, or new bike reviews — just real-world tech, do-it-yourself installs, and homebuilt customs. These issues are available on the newsstand or through the mail from GreaseRag.com.

Subscribe & Save
How do you get American Iron Magazine? We’d like to thank all of our loyal readers for your on-going support in keeping us the best-selling magazine in our field. We work hard to get the best possible product to as many stores as we can. Yet the cost of doing business in the traditional single-copy industry continues to climb, and I don’t see this changing for the better any time soon.

I won’t go into the details here, but I suspect it’s going to become increasingly difficult to find magazines on your local newsstands. With that in mind, I encourage you to subscribe (in print, call 877/693-3572, or digital delivery at Zinio.com) to American Iron Magazine for yourself and as gifts for your riding buddies.

It’s up to you if you want to pay $7 per issue on the newsstand or $2 per issue through a subscription. In fact, you can buy a subscription for yourself and for two friends for less than buying one year’s worth on the newsstand. Something to consider. Regardless of how you buy American Iron Magazine, all of us here appreciate your support.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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Compression Ratios I

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

Have you ever been in a pack of bikes and heard one that had an exhaust note that crackled with power when the rider blipped the throttle? That, my friend, is the sound of a high-compression engine! And though some try to imitate it with real short drag pipes or holes in their mufflers, nothing has the crisp bite of a high-compression engine, in sound or throttle response.

Boosting an engine’s compression ratio is a time-honored and effective method of increasing its performance. If done correctly, it’s a modification that will enable an engine to produce more power while also increasing its efficiency (fuel mileage). Increasing the compression ratio will also make your engine accelerate (build rpm) faster, which will make the engine more responsive when you crack the throttle. However, like everything in the world, every modification has its pluses and minuses. So before you head down to the service department with a fistful of dollars, you should understand what compression ratio is, why it produces more power, and what the possible drawbacks are.

As you’ve seen in countless tech stories and bike features, an engine’s compression ratio is usually ststed as, for example, 10:1 and read as 10 to 1, like any other ratio. What this means is that the volume of the area above the piston, which is mostly the combustion chamber, and the volume of the cylinder when the piston is at the lowest point of its stroke — called its Bottom Dead Center position (BDC) — will be reduced to one-tenth of that size when the piston is at the highest point of its stroke, or its Top Dead Center position (TDC). The notation 10:1 simply states that the air/fuel mixture will be compressed into the cylinder head’s combustion chamber until it occupies a space one-tenth as large as the volume of the cylinder and combustion chamber combined. A notation like 10.5:1 simply means the ratio is 10-1/2 to one.

As for why increasing the engine’s compression enables it to put out more power, remember when we discussed how power is produced? The piston is driven down in its cylinder by the pressure produced in the combustion chamber by the rapidly burning fuel and air mixture. How hard this pressure pushes down on the piston determines how much power the engine produces. And if the pressure that the air/fuel mixture’s under is increased before it’s ignited — meaning the engine’s compression ratio has been raised — the burning gases will exert even more pressure onto the piston, producing more power. It’s like a coiled spring in that if you compress it a little, it pushes back a little. But the more you compress it, the harder it pushes back.

We’ll cover possible drawbacks of raising an engine’s compression and other details in a future column.

See you on the road

Chris Maida

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Sturgis History & Our Plans

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

The annual black hills classic, otherwise known to most riders simply as Sturgis, is right down the road. And this year’s event looks like it’s going to be off the charts. Billed as one of the largest motorcycle events in the world, Sturgis certainly is one of my personal favorites. I’m not so much into the scene on Lazelle Street or what takes place at some of the campgrounds, as I prefer to be riding the amazing roads you find once you get out of town.

This year marks the 75th Black Hills Classic, and you know how much we riders and enthusiasts love anniversary years. Did you know this event was started on August 14, 1938, by “Pappy” Hoel and the Jackpine Gypsies motorcycle club? The highlight of that first event was nine locals in a scrappy motorcycle race on a backyard track. While today the event is dominated by Harley riders, it didn’t start out that way because Pappy was the local Indian dealer.

Given that scenario, we thought it would be a great year to celebrate history with a salute to the old timers who started the Sturgis rally in the first place, especially those Indian motor­cycle riders who supported Pappy’s ambitions.

Indian Motorcycle Black Hills Run 2015
As we go to press, we’re supporting­ rides to Sturgis. I will lead one from Iowa, and my friend Mike “Kiwi” Tomas will take charge of the Ross Tomas Memorial Ride from Southern California. My ride starts at the National Motorcycle Museum in Anamosa, Iowa, the morning of Thursday, July 30, and we should pull into Sturgis on Saturday evening. Riders interested in the Ross Tomas Memorial Ride should call Kiwi Indian at 951/788-0048 for dates and info.

Both rides are free and open to riders of all makes, models, and years of motorcycles. Each rider will be responsible for his own bike, transportation, hotel, etc. Everyone is welcome to ride with us, but please keep in mind that we’re honoring Indian’s role in Sturgis by inviting all Indian riders (old or new bikes) to ride at the front of the pack. Please note, too, that we intend to stay off the major highways as much as possible so we can ride at an appropriate pace for classic motorcycles. We will post updates on AIMag.com and the American Iron Magazine Facebook page as needed.

Indian-Rally-ad-2015Indian & Classic American Iron — Black Hills Rally 2015
Years ago, our magazine created the Indian & Classic American Iron Rallies in Daytona and Sturgis. I loved those rallies, and they were run in the spirit of old-fashioned fun, with great machines, people and stories, fun field events, and a terrific vintage bike show.

We usually don’t hear about free motorcycle shows anymore. Thanks to a number of sponsors, though, we’re bringing this free event back on Tuesday, August 4, at the Buffalo Chip. Free registration opens around 9 am, the field events are scheduled to begin at noon, and trophies will be awarded at 4 pm.

It’s free and open to all (old and new) Indian motorcycles and all other classic pre-1984 American motorcycles. A big thank you to Dennis Kirk for sponsoring the bike show and also to a growing list of participating companies, including Kiwi Indian, Heather’s Leathers, Jerry Greer’s Engineering, and others for their support.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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American Iron Magazine Content

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

I’ve been getting lots of letters lately from readers concerned that since Motorcycle Bagger has been discontinued, we’re going to flood American Iron with suitcases, as one reader called them. I guess they’re reacting to Buzz’s column in Issue #323, where he stated that we were going to start adding a bit more bagger editorial and tech into AIM. Flooding AIM with baggers isn’t what Buzz meant. We plan on having a bike feature and tech article for the bagger guys in every issue. Sometimes we may also have a Reader’s Ride that’s also a bagger, like it is in this issue.  We always had baggers and bagger tech in AIM before Motorcycle Bagger, so we’re going back to that
format, but with more regularity.

While I’m at it, I should also address any reader concerns that we’re going to start filling American Iron with Victory and/or Indian articles in every issue. I say that because we have three articles with Victory content in this issue: Techline, American Motorcycle Girl, and a short review in our Daytona Bike Week coverage. That’s not the start of a trend. True, we have been putting more Indian and Victory content into AIM, but our plan is not to pull out Harley content to do that.

What we strive to do in American Iron Magazine is have something for everyone who’s interested in American motor­cycling. Our goal is to cover the full scope of what this encompasses, be it custom baggers, Softails, Dynas, V-Rods, Sportsters, or trikes, both pro and home-built. We also cover vintage bikes and tech as well as new models by Harley, Indian, Victory, and other American manufacturers, such as the new ARCH Motorcycle. Though the bulk of our coverage is Harley-oriented, Indian, Victory, and other USA-made brands have a place in AIM.

Since I’m on the subject of our magazine’s content, I might as well address other areas of reader concern. During the course of the year, I get letters from readers saying there are too many customs, too many old bikes, too much tech, etc. in the magazine. We split American Iron approximately in half regarding custom bikes and tech. We do this because there are many readers who love to check out the latest trends as well as what other builders are doing, since these readers build a bike from scratch or customize a production bike. We put in lots of tech, much more than other magazines, for our readers who have no interest in customs. They want articles on new bikes, and what they can do to improve the power, handling, whatever of their basically stock-looking bikes.

So please continue to send me letters telling me what you do and don’t like as well as any other concerns you have regarding AIM content. We take them into account as we plan our issues for the year. And thanks for being an American Iron Magazine reader!

See you on the road,

Chris Maida

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Increasing Motorcycle Engine Size

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

Want more power? Get a bigger engine. It’s as simple as that. And though increasing your engine’s displacement isn’t the only way to get more power, it’s a very effective one. Since an engine’s displacement is the result of two factors — the bore of its cylinders and the stroke of its pistons — increasing either one (or both) will make your engine larger and more powerful.

The displacement of a piston engine is the total swept volume of all the engine’s cylinders. A cylinder’s swept volume is the area that the piston travels (sweeps) over as it moves up and down its cylinder, called its stroke. The displacement (area) of a cylinder depends on its diameter (bore) and length (stroke). To compute a cylinder’s displacement, you plug these two measurements into the formula: bore x bore x 0.7854 x stroke. The number 0.7854 is a constant value that’s needed to make it all work out correctly.

Once you have the swept volume of  a cylinder, you multiply that number by the amount of cylinders the engine has, which for V-twins is two, to get the total cubic-inch (or cubic centimeter for you metric lovers) displacement of the engine. If you use the bore and stroke measurements for a TC 103, you’ll get (3.875″ x 3.875″ x 0.7854″ x 4.375″) x 2 for a total of 103.19″ (1,690 cc).

The purpose of a big-bore cylinder kit is to dramatically increase the diameter of an engine’s cylinder bores. There are two ways to do this: buy bigger bore cylinders or machine the bore of the stock cylinders larger. The stock TC 88 and TC 96, and 883 Sportster cylinders have walls about 1/4″ thick, so they can be bored out to the same diameter as some big-bore kit cylinders and still thick enough for safe engine operation.

Changing the bore of an engine to increase its displacement should not be confused with an overbore, which is done during an engine rebuild to remove imperfections in the cylinder’s walls. While an overbore does change the bore size slightly, it’s a very small amount – 0.005″ or so, depending on the amount of damage to the cylinder walls. Once you’ve changed the bore of the cylinders, even if it’s just 0.005″ over for a rebuild, you need to
install new, equally larger pistons and rings.

As for engine longevity, there are no problems associated with increasing an engine’s bore, other than the additional stress and strain that the increased power will put on all the engine and powertrain components. However, the size of the cylinder holes in the crankcases, called the cylinder spigots, limits how much you can increase the cylinder bores. That’s why builders who want very large displacement engines must also increase the engine’s stroke. And that’s what we’ll cover in another issue.

See you on the road,

Chris Maida

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How Motorcycle Engine Power Is Produced

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

Whenever you get around a group of riders, compression ratios, cubic inches, and cam lifts, as well as a multitude of other modifications, are discussed and compared, along with the resulting torque and horsepower numbers. But why does increasing an engine’s cubic inches (known as its displacement) result in more power? And why does installing the highest lift cam you can buy usually result in less power being produced?

All engine performance mods, from something as basic as bolting on a freer-flowing air cleaner to exotic systems like superchargers or nitrous oxide, are designed to do one thing: get more air/fuel mixture over the piston, so it can be ignited — hopefully when it will do the most good — and burned as efficiently as possible. Period. The heat energy released by burning gasoline and oxygen is what the piston and associated parts turn into the mechanical energy needed to turn the rear wheel. Think about it: it’s not the size of the cam’s lobes that allow an engine to develop more power, it’s how well a specific cam works with the engine’s other components to get as much air/fuel mixture into the cylinders as possible for each combustion event.

But getting the cylinders filled is not the only factor in getting the most from what you have. When the ignition system fires the spark plugs to burn the mixture and how efficiently that mixture burns also plays a big part in how much power will be produced. The spark plug should ignite the air/fuel mixture before the piston starts on its way back down the cylinder on its power stroke. This is done so the mixture has time to ignite and burn. The piston is driven down the cylinder by the pressure produced in the combustion chamber by the rapidly burning fuel and air. To get the most power, you want the piston just past the top of its compression stroke by the time the mixture has burned to the point where the now-expanding gases can push their hardest on the piston, driving it down the cylinder on its power stroke. As for having an efficient burn, the more completely you burn the air/fuel mixture, the more power you’ll get from it.

To get a very efficient burn, the fuel must be completely atomized and thoroughly mixed with air in the right proportions before it’s ignited by the spark plug. The fuel and air are initially mixed in the engine’s intake system. However, for a very efficient burn, the fuel and air should be mixed again in the combustion chamber just before it’s ignited. The combustion chamber and piston design on Evos and Twin Cams do this by turbulently mixing the air/fuel mixture as it’s compressed into the combustion chamber by the rising piston. Just for the record, you don’t want turbulence in the intake or exhaust tracts; laminar flow is the way to go in the ports.

See you on the road,

Chris Maida

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Neglected Pre-Ride Motorcycle Maintenance Part 2

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

In the last issue, I wrote about how many owners routinely neglect their bike’s tires. This time around, we’ll look at the second important area I see many owners overlooking: their brake systems. Checking the brake pads, brake lines, and rotors takes only a few minutes, since they’re out in the open. Thankfully, these components only need to be checked every 2,500 miles. However, if you ride less than 1,000 miles a year, don’t go by the bike’s mileage in regard to the brake lines, since time is the enemy here as much as mileage. Every six months should be sufficient.

To check the brake pads, look at where both pads contact the rotor. If the metal baseplate of the pad is close (under 1/16″) to touching the rotor, change the pads. Inspect the rubber section of the brake lines for cracks, the metal areas for rust. Needless to say, you don’t want to see either one. If you do, replace the lines. For the rotors, look for bluing or grooves on either side of the rotor. Slight grooves in the rotor are normal, deep grooves are not. Also make sure the bolts are tight. You don’t have to pull out a torque wrench to check the hardware, just put a tool on them and see if they move easily. If they don’t, they’re good to go.

The last brake maintenance item is a bit more involved: changing the brake fluid. This is the area I see neglected the most. Thankfully, you only swap out the brake fluid every two years if your bike uses DOT 3 or 4. That’s how long it takes DOT 3 or 4 to absorb enough moisture to become a problem. Water inside the brake system corrodes the brake lines and such from the inside and can cause a failure even though things look fine on the outside. Just for the record, you can put DOT 4 in a DOT 3 system, but don’t put DOT 3 in a DOT 4 system. Also, DOT 5 and DOT 5.1 are not the same. Don’t interchange them!

Of course, while you’re looking at the brake system, which also includes checking the brake fluid level, you can also check the axle nuts, wheels, etc., but a long checklist is, I think, the main reason most riders don’t check anything. Personally, I recommend inspecting a few different items each time you’re about to fire off the engine. This trip it’s the brake system, next time it’s the wheels and axle nuts, etc. Sure, the best way is to check everything every time you plan on going for a ride, but that’s not going to happen in most cases. If it’s all or nothing, it’s safer, in my opinion, to check a section of your bike each time you plan on going for a ride. That said, you should always check the tires before each ride!

See you on the road.

Chris Maida

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Chain Tensioner Blues

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

I’ve been getting a lot of letters from readers concerned about the cam chain tensioners in their Twin Cam engines. They want to know at what mileage the fiber shoe on the tensioners will wear out. Unfortunately, there’s no simple answer to this question, since it depends on a few factors.

For starters, tensioner shoe wear is tied to engine rpm, not mileage. An engine spinning at 2500 rpm when the bike is in second gear and going 30 mph is wearing out its tensioner shoes the same amount as when the bike is in fifth and going 60, and yet the bike is traveling twice as many miles. This means a bike ridden mostly around town will wear out its tensioner shoes at a lower mileage than a bike ridden mostly on the highway.

Another factor to consider is whether your bike has the spring-loaded tensioners or the newer hydraulic units. The spring type is original equipment in all 1999-2006 Twin Cams, except 2006 Dynas, which got the hydraulic units that year. All 2007 to present Twin Cams have the hydraulic tensioners. This is important because the spring-loaded tensioners wear out much faster than their hydraulic counterparts. The spring-loaded tensioners are always applying the same amount of pressure onto the cam chain and, therefore, the tensioner shoes.

The hydraulic tensioners apply pressure based on engine oil pressure. When the engine is idling or at low power settings, engine oil pressure is low, so the tensioners are not applying much pressure to the chains, keeping shoe wear to a minimum. This is why the spring-loaded tensioners usually wear out their shoes in 15,000-30,000 miles while the hydraulic units have been lasting anywhere from 30,000 to 70,000.

You can check the outer tensioner’s shoe by pulling off the cam cover, which brings us to the final factor to remember. The inner tensioner shoe, on both spring and hydraulic tensioners, always wears out faster than the outer one. If the outer shoe is three quarters worn, the inner one is probably gone or just about to go.

To change the inner tensioner and its shoe, you have to pull the entire cam support plate assembly out of the engine and take this assembly apart. This is why many owners take this opportunity to upgrade to the new-style hydraulic units and cam support plate. (Why go into your engine again in 20,000 miles or so?) It’s also a good idea to upgrade to the new-style oil pump at this time. Many owners also put in a set of performance cams that don’t require any headwork at this time, since the only additional cost is the cams themselves, a fuel tuner, and the tuning time, but that’s a whole different issue.

See you on the road.

Chris

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This column originally appeared in issue #314 of American Iron Magazine.

(Interested in tackling this project? Our friends at Fix My Hog have a video that lays it all out for you. Click here to check it out.)

 

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Riding In Manila

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

As you’ll see on page 70, I went to the Philippines for a vacation last March. While there I went diving and rode a Harley around the island of Luzon for a couple of days with Emerson Raymundo, the sales and marketing manager of Harley-Davidson of Manila, and Mark Querubin, a local HOG member.

Many riders are familiar with the term “adventure riding,” which is broadly defined as touring on all types of terrain. It’s for the experienced rider only. Well, riding in the cities of the Philippines like a local is what I call “adventure urban riding.” By that I mean it’s not for the faint of heart or a novice rider. That’s not to say it’s dangerous or bad, but it is different than what we’re used to in the States.

In the Philippines, the lines on the road are more like suggestions than the strict boundaries they are here. If the traffic on your side of the road has stopped (the congestion is mind-boggling), simply move to the left and keep going if you so choose — and many locals do. Many times Emerson, Mark, and I were riding between the oncoming traffic and the stopped buses, cars, trucks, Jeepneys (Filipino buses), and tricycles on our right. However, it’s not like threading your way through heavy traffic in New York, or any other congested American city, as I quickly learned after I made the mistake of passing a Jeepney on the right. If you want to pass someone, just give a beep on the horn to let him know you’re there and then pass on the left. If you have to ride on the other side of the centerline to do that, no worries, no issues.

The way I made sense of it is this: everyone knows the traffic is horrendous and that everyone has to get somewhere, so motor­cycle, tricycle, and bicycle traffic flows more like water around a large rock in a stream than in rigid conformity to lines painted on the road. People let two- and three-wheeled vehicles pass them without a second thought. A big part of what makes it all work is the unaggressive attitude of the participants. It’s a system that works well — though to the newcomer it looks chaotic bordering on insane. Truth be told, I really enjoyed riding like this!

Once I got back to the States, it felt wrong to just sit and wait in a line of cars during rush hour when there was plenty of room for me to move down the road. Unfortunately, the only place you can split lanes legally here is in California, since there’s no law against it. However, there’s no law saying you can do it, either.

See you on the road.

Chris 

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This article originally appeared in issue #312 of American Iron Magazine

 

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Support A Local Charity Ride

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

Now that the warm weather has (finally!) arrived throughout the country, there are numerous charity rides happening in every state. Thankfully, motorcyclists are great supporters of these rides, which are an excellent way to spend a Sunday riding while also helping out a person, family, or organization in need.

Last year, I attended one based at Empire Harley-Davidson in New Rochelle, NY to benefit the family of a good friend of mine who passed away due to cancer. This time around, the good folks at Empire are hosting a ride for Taylor Madison Mangiere, a 3-year-old girl with cystic fibrosis. As you would expect, besides the emotional strain this has put on her family, there is also a huge financial burden. A local group is running a police- escorted benefit ride for Taylor and her family on June 1. The ride will start at Empire Harley-Davidson and conclude at the Off The Grid Bar and Grill in Harrison, New York, with a block party (barbecue, soda, water). Empire opens at 10 am and registration for the ride will start at 10:30. It’s kickstands up at 11 sharp. And to entice you a bit more to do the ride, I’ll pick a bike that participates in Taylor’s benefit ride for a one-page My Sweet Hog feature in an upcoming issue of American Iron Magazine. For up to date info, check out ShieldAndCross.com.

If you were around the lower Westchester area in the 1970s and ‘80s like I was, you may remember a popular local group called Rat Race Choir. Well, they’ll be playing at the block party, so if you want to flash to the past with the rest of us, be sure to show up. Tie-dyed shirts and such are optional.

Another excellent benefit in the New York area is Aidan’s Ride, which is also happening on June 1. This annual ride benefits the Aidan Jack Seeger Foundation, which was established to help families with children who have ALD, a deadly disease that attacks very young children, and to push for newborn screening which would help save lives. The ride starts at Indian Larry Motorcycles in Brooklyn. Line up starts at 9 am and it’s kickstands up at 11.

The planned route takes you on a scenic tour on four parkways with views of the Brooklyn Bridge, NYC skyline, Jones Beach, and Robert Moses Beach. The ride ends at The Emporium in Patchogue, NY, with an after party with a buffet and live music. For up to date info go to AidenHasAPosse.org and then click on the Aidan’s Ride NY banner when it appears.

See you on the road.

Chris

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This article originally appeared in issue #311 of American Iron Magazine.

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