American Iron Wants To Publish Your Harley Photos

We at American Iron Magazine and our all-tech American Iron Garage want our readers to share your bikes, photos and stories with us and in our pages.

We love to get and share your letters in our magazines, especially when you include good photos of you and your bike.

Right now, our focus is on “before” and “after” photos of your bike. We need in focus, well lit photos of the entire bike as you bought it, and then good photos of your Harley, Indian or Victory after you modified or customized it. We also would like a little info on what you did, why and how, and your name and address.

Please send the “before and after” photos to Garage@AmericanIronMag.com. And you can always send your letters to Letters@AmericanIronMag.com.

Compression Ratios III

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

Moderately boosting the compression, like going from 9:1 to 10:1 or 10.25:1, shouldn’t run you afoul of engine knock in a big way. However, a high-compression engine can be unforgiving and difficult to tune, especially a Twin Cam, if you go past 10.5:1. Even stock H-D engines have bouts with knock due to the very lean fuel/air mixture needed to meet EPA regulations. Thankfully, there are ways to prevent engine knock and an easy one is to not let the engine overheat. In case you haven’t noticed, a lean running engine will rattle and ping more often on a hot day, especially in heavy traffic. The combination of a very lean mixture and high engine operating temperatures aggravates the situation and gives engine knock an open invitation to trash your engine.

The method The Motor Company uses in its 2000 and later Softails, and 2002 and later rubber-mount models, is to mess with the ignition timing. All Delphi EFI control modules have a ping sensor, which detects whenever the Big K makes an appearance via a process called ion sensing. If the control module detects engine knock, it retards the ignition timing (moves it to a less aggressive setting) until the knocking stops. In fact, if the engine is not set up correctly for a high compression ratio, this system will retard the timing to the point of engine power loss, which, of course, defeats the purpose of having a high-compression engine in the first place. The fix for this is to have the module remapped for a high-compression engine.

Those with carburetor-equipped bikes can install a fully adjustable, single-fire ignition. This allows you to dial in the initial ignition timing and advance curve that’ll keep the combustion bogeyman away. The goal is to use the most aggressive advance curve possible, while still avoiding knock. Once correctly dialed-in, you’ll get the most power from your engine, while also protecting it from damage.

A word also needs to be said about riding style. Whacking open the throttle when the engine’s rpm is below its powerband will make even a properly tuned engine knock and ping. Down-shifting is the simple fix here.

Another way to eliminate knock is to use long-duration cams, which are camshafts with a lot of valve overlap. Valve overlap is when both the intake and exhaust valves are open briefly at the same time. This allows some of the engine’s compression to bleed off at low rpm, which is where engine knock always occurs. In fact, running the correct set of long-duration cams with a set of high-compression pistons will give you a nice gain in power. Be sure to talk with the cam manufacturer before buying to make sure you get the correct grind for your engine, bike, and riding style. Taking valve overlap too far, and ignoring other cam profile factors, can kill performance.

See you on the road

Chris Maida

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Motorcycle Magazines — Still Cheaper Than A Latte

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

I’m often asked how we decide which articles to publish in this magazine. Non-riders I talk with are amazed that there are enough motorcycle topics for us to fill a magazine this size every four weeks (we publish 13 issues of American Iron Magazine a year) without running out of material. Many riders often request that we publish articles that are of specific interest to them: like only baggers, Softails, Panheads, or whatever they’re into.

In general, here’s the procedure that Chris Maida (the hardest working editor in our business) and I follow on what seems like a weekly basis. As an enthusiast magazine, our job is to educate and entertain you with informative articles in every issue. Because our 100,000-plus readers’ interests cover a broad spectrum of American motor­cycle-related topics, we spread our coverage as widely as possible to give real value to all readers.

Every issue offers American motorcycles. There are new reviews and as many different types of customs as we can fit; you’ll find everything from backyard builds to pro-built customs, plus at least one classic American bike. Those full-feature articles are joined by a list of departments that include three favorites: Reader’s Ride, Snaps, and Letters. And as you’ve probably noticed, those departments are filled with photos of our readers’ bikes. We love to feature your rides, and we encourage you to send your photos to Letters@AmericanIronMag.com and ReadersRide@AmericanIronMag.com so that you can be part of our magazine family.

American Iron Magazine is also filled with informative and factual new bike and product reviews, plus tours and event coverage. Chris then puts together an assortment of tech and how-to articles for our readers, from novice to skilled mechanic, to complete the editorial package.

Our subtitle has been “For People Who Love Harley-Davidsons” since 1989, and most of our editorial is Harley-specific. But we add Indian, Victory, and other American motorcycles because our readers have asked for that.

If you have specific ideas on how we can make American Iron Magazine a better package or if you have comments, please pass them along at Letters@AmericanIronMag.com. We’d like to hear from you.

In addition to American Iron Magazine, we also publish American Iron Garage, a tech and DIY publication. AIG has no tours, events, or new bike reviews — just real-world tech, do-it-yourself installs, and homebuilt customs. These issues are available on the newsstand or through the mail from GreaseRag.com.

Subscribe & Save
How do you get American Iron Magazine? We’d like to thank all of our loyal readers for your on-going support in keeping us the best-selling magazine in our field. We work hard to get the best possible product to as many stores as we can. Yet the cost of doing business in the traditional single-copy industry continues to climb, and I don’t see this changing for the better any time soon.

I won’t go into the details here, but I suspect it’s going to become increasingly difficult to find magazines on your local newsstands. With that in mind, I encourage you to subscribe (in print, call 877/693-3572, or digital delivery at Zinio.com) to American Iron Magazine for yourself and as gifts for your riding buddies.

It’s up to you if you want to pay $7 per issue on the newsstand or $2 per issue through a subscription. In fact, you can buy a subscription for yourself and for two friends for less than buying one year’s worth on the newsstand. Something to consider. Regardless of how you buy American Iron Magazine, all of us here appreciate your support.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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Compression Ratios I

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

Have you ever been in a pack of bikes and heard one that had an exhaust note that crackled with power when the rider blipped the throttle? That, my friend, is the sound of a high-compression engine! And though some try to imitate it with real short drag pipes or holes in their mufflers, nothing has the crisp bite of a high-compression engine, in sound or throttle response.

Boosting an engine’s compression ratio is a time-honored and effective method of increasing its performance. If done correctly, it’s a modification that will enable an engine to produce more power while also increasing its efficiency (fuel mileage). Increasing the compression ratio will also make your engine accelerate (build rpm) faster, which will make the engine more responsive when you crack the throttle. However, like everything in the world, every modification has its pluses and minuses. So before you head down to the service department with a fistful of dollars, you should understand what compression ratio is, why it produces more power, and what the possible drawbacks are.

As you’ve seen in countless tech stories and bike features, an engine’s compression ratio is usually ststed as, for example, 10:1 and read as 10 to 1, like any other ratio. What this means is that the volume of the area above the piston, which is mostly the combustion chamber, and the volume of the cylinder when the piston is at the lowest point of its stroke — called its Bottom Dead Center position (BDC) — will be reduced to one-tenth of that size when the piston is at the highest point of its stroke, or its Top Dead Center position (TDC). The notation 10:1 simply states that the air/fuel mixture will be compressed into the cylinder head’s combustion chamber until it occupies a space one-tenth as large as the volume of the cylinder and combustion chamber combined. A notation like 10.5:1 simply means the ratio is 10-1/2 to one.

As for why increasing the engine’s compression enables it to put out more power, remember when we discussed how power is produced? The piston is driven down in its cylinder by the pressure produced in the combustion chamber by the rapidly burning fuel and air mixture. How hard this pressure pushes down on the piston determines how much power the engine produces. And if the pressure that the air/fuel mixture’s under is increased before it’s ignited — meaning the engine’s compression ratio has been raised — the burning gases will exert even more pressure onto the piston, producing more power. It’s like a coiled spring in that if you compress it a little, it pushes back a little. But the more you compress it, the harder it pushes back.

We’ll cover possible drawbacks of raising an engine’s compression and other details in a future column.

See you on the road

Chris Maida

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Sturgis History & Our Plans

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

The annual black hills classic, otherwise known to most riders simply as Sturgis, is right down the road. And this year’s event looks like it’s going to be off the charts. Billed as one of the largest motorcycle events in the world, Sturgis certainly is one of my personal favorites. I’m not so much into the scene on Lazelle Street or what takes place at some of the campgrounds, as I prefer to be riding the amazing roads you find once you get out of town.

This year marks the 75th Black Hills Classic, and you know how much we riders and enthusiasts love anniversary years. Did you know this event was started on August 14, 1938, by “Pappy” Hoel and the Jackpine Gypsies motorcycle club? The highlight of that first event was nine locals in a scrappy motorcycle race on a backyard track. While today the event is dominated by Harley riders, it didn’t start out that way because Pappy was the local Indian dealer.

Given that scenario, we thought it would be a great year to celebrate history with a salute to the old timers who started the Sturgis rally in the first place, especially those Indian motor­cycle riders who supported Pappy’s ambitions.

Indian Motorcycle Black Hills Run 2015
As we go to press, we’re supporting­ rides to Sturgis. I will lead one from Iowa, and my friend Mike “Kiwi” Tomas will take charge of the Ross Tomas Memorial Ride from Southern California. My ride starts at the National Motorcycle Museum in Anamosa, Iowa, the morning of Thursday, July 30, and we should pull into Sturgis on Saturday evening. Riders interested in the Ross Tomas Memorial Ride should call Kiwi Indian at 951/788-0048 for dates and info.

Both rides are free and open to riders of all makes, models, and years of motorcycles. Each rider will be responsible for his own bike, transportation, hotel, etc. Everyone is welcome to ride with us, but please keep in mind that we’re honoring Indian’s role in Sturgis by inviting all Indian riders (old or new bikes) to ride at the front of the pack. Please note, too, that we intend to stay off the major highways as much as possible so we can ride at an appropriate pace for classic motorcycles. We will post updates on AIMag.com and the American Iron Magazine Facebook page as needed.

Indian-Rally-ad-2015Indian & Classic American Iron — Black Hills Rally 2015
Years ago, our magazine created the Indian & Classic American Iron Rallies in Daytona and Sturgis. I loved those rallies, and they were run in the spirit of old-fashioned fun, with great machines, people and stories, fun field events, and a terrific vintage bike show.

We usually don’t hear about free motorcycle shows anymore. Thanks to a number of sponsors, though, we’re bringing this free event back on Tuesday, August 4, at the Buffalo Chip. Free registration opens around 9 am, the field events are scheduled to begin at noon, and trophies will be awarded at 4 pm.

It’s free and open to all (old and new) Indian motorcycles and all other classic pre-1984 American motorcycles. A big thank you to Dennis Kirk for sponsoring the bike show and also to a growing list of participating companies, including Kiwi Indian, Heather’s Leathers, Jerry Greer’s Engineering, and others for their support.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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New Bike Review – 2015 H-D Dyna Low Rider

324-18-42015 H-D Dyna Low Rider

Versatility of a Swiss Army knife

text and photography by Dain Gingerelli

Here’s a recap of my workweek: after meddling with various tasks in my office Monday morning, I snuck out on the FXDL Dyna Low Rider for lunch at the big-box store, otherwise known as Costco. I’m an easy mark for Costco’s hot dog and coke combo, especially at the price, a buck fifty. I also can’t pass up an opportunity to get out of the office to ride bikes like the Low Rider, so the prospect of munching on that dog and coke sounded even more appealing as I saddled up.

In fact, my whole week went much like Monday.  Tuesday, I rode the Low rider through nearby Silverado Canyon in California to check if the US Forest Service had opened the gate to the dirt road leading up the Saddleback landmark. My best friend and I were planning a ride up that hill on our dual-sport bikes; if the gate was open, we would ride up the following weekend. It wasn’t open, but I still took the opportunity last tuesday to enjoy lunch on the way home at the Silverado Cafe, always a treat. The Low Rider waited patiently outside, its sidestand down, while I dined on a greasy, delicious burger inside.

I began writing this review first thing Wednesday morning, but soon enough, I reasoned that I probably should put some more miles on the Dyna to really “get a feel” for what the bike is about, so off I went, southbound on Interstate-5, taking me past Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton. It’s a pleasant ride, with wide, sweeping vistas of the blue Pacific Ocean to my right, and the route takes me past the Basilone Road exit, named in honor of Marine Gunnery Sgt. John Basilone, recipient of the Medal of Honor for heroism at the Battle of Guadalcanal during World War II. Later during the war, he was awarded the Navy cross for his heroics at the Battle of Iwo Jima where he lost his life in further combat. I always pay my respects to the sergeant with a moment of silence from the saddle whenever I pass that exit. The Dyna Low Rider was in full stride, too, the Twin Cam 103″ engine purring smoothly the soothing din from its collector exhaust ever so discernible above the wind blast around my Arai helmet. It was as if the Low Rider knew that this particular gunny sergeant deserved respect.

And on Thursday, I heard about a new wall mural by street artist Bandit, so I rode the Dyna to nearby San Clemente to check out his handiwork with the spray cans, and now it’s Friday morning, and I’m staring at a deadline for this bike review. I’ll admit, too, that it was easier today to leave the Low Rider in my garage because its rear Michelin Scorcher “31” tire had, at some point during my week’s travels, developed a slow leak. Good excuse as any, I guess, to get back to work.

The Dyna Low Rider has a way of doing that, distracting you from everyday life. The bike is so congenial to all manner of street riding that you’ll feel confident taking it anywhere and everywhere there’s pavement. care to carve through a canyon, following the serpentine road as it snakes left to right? Not a problem because this Dyna’s steering is deliberate and precise, especially considering the FXDL’s cruiser roots date back to 1977. The Michelin rubber — 100/90-19″ up front and 160/70-17″ on the rear — do a fine job of gripping the asphalt, so you never feel off balance.

Like what you see? The full article is in American Iron Magazine issue # 324, NOW ON NEWSSTANDS! To order a back issue of this or any other issue of American Iron Magazine, visit Greaserag.com.
 
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American Iron Magazine Content

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

I’ve been getting lots of letters lately from readers concerned that since Motorcycle Bagger has been discontinued, we’re going to flood American Iron with suitcases, as one reader called them. I guess they’re reacting to Buzz’s column in Issue #323, where he stated that we were going to start adding a bit more bagger editorial and tech into AIM. Flooding AIM with baggers isn’t what Buzz meant. We plan on having a bike feature and tech article for the bagger guys in every issue. Sometimes we may also have a Reader’s Ride that’s also a bagger, like it is in this issue.  We always had baggers and bagger tech in AIM before Motorcycle Bagger, so we’re going back to that
format, but with more regularity.

While I’m at it, I should also address any reader concerns that we’re going to start filling American Iron with Victory and/or Indian articles in every issue. I say that because we have three articles with Victory content in this issue: Techline, American Motorcycle Girl, and a short review in our Daytona Bike Week coverage. That’s not the start of a trend. True, we have been putting more Indian and Victory content into AIM, but our plan is not to pull out Harley content to do that.

What we strive to do in American Iron Magazine is have something for everyone who’s interested in American motor­cycling. Our goal is to cover the full scope of what this encompasses, be it custom baggers, Softails, Dynas, V-Rods, Sportsters, or trikes, both pro and home-built. We also cover vintage bikes and tech as well as new models by Harley, Indian, Victory, and other American manufacturers, such as the new ARCH Motorcycle. Though the bulk of our coverage is Harley-oriented, Indian, Victory, and other USA-made brands have a place in AIM.

Since I’m on the subject of our magazine’s content, I might as well address other areas of reader concern. During the course of the year, I get letters from readers saying there are too many customs, too many old bikes, too much tech, etc. in the magazine. We split American Iron approximately in half regarding custom bikes and tech. We do this because there are many readers who love to check out the latest trends as well as what other builders are doing, since these readers build a bike from scratch or customize a production bike. We put in lots of tech, much more than other magazines, for our readers who have no interest in customs. They want articles on new bikes, and what they can do to improve the power, handling, whatever of their basically stock-looking bikes.

So please continue to send me letters telling me what you do and don’t like as well as any other concerns you have regarding AIM content. We take them into account as we plan our issues for the year. And thanks for being an American Iron Magazine reader!

See you on the road,

Chris Maida

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No More Motorcycle Gas Pains?

buzz-headshot

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

I was riding streetbikes in the 1970s when the first gas and oil crisis hit America.  If you’re of a certain age, you probably can recall the OPEC embargo and subsequent gas rationing that followed. Our government decided for us that we had to line up for hours at gas stations to fill up our tanks. To handle the high demand for the low volume of available gasoline, our odd- or even-numbered license plates determined what days we could buy gas.

That was the first time I recall the experts predicting a mass migration from huge gas-guzzling American cars to more fuel-efficient motorcycles. From that time on, whenever we experience significant spikes in gas prices we also hear the chorus of experts predicting more motorcycle riders. But the reality is, for whatever reason, something else happens.

So now America is blessed with the opposite situation in terms of available fuel. Gas prices are down — way down — because supply is up. Should we expect the so-called experts to predict fewer motorcycles on the road? Not at all. So what’s going on here?

I’m convinced that most people, at least in North America, do not ride motorcycles for the fuel efficiency, especially when the electric and hybrid cars use less gas and oil than even the most frugal motorcycles. Are electric motorcycles in our future? You bet. They are offering some fast and terrific-looking machines, but I don’t feel their sales will hit critical mass until battery technology improves significantly.

However, I’m convinced that most people buy motor­cycles, especially big traditional American-built bikes with V-twin engines, because they are fun to ride. We all have our own reasons why we ride, but I’d bet my 1948 Panhead that, for many of us, it’s for fun and the feeling of freedom on the road.

Indian-Rally-ad-2015Ride With Us
We like to meet our readers, plus we like to ride, so this is the best of both worlds. Our next event is our Motorcycle Kickstart Classic, which is slated for the last weekend of May in Maggie Valley, North Carolina. It’s open to all makes, models, and age motorcycles, but we insist that electric-start bikes ride at the back of the pack to pick up any parts that fall off the old bikes up front. All riders and passengers must register in advance. Details at AIMag.com.

Then on June 20, we head to Ham Lake, Minnesota, for the Patriot Ride (ThePatriotRide.org), a relatively new, but fast-growing ride and bike show. Our magazines will sponsor the bike shows and, we plan to feature some of the bikes in our pages.

Sturgis
did you know the sturgis rally began in 1938 as a local race put on by Indian Motocycle dealer Pappy Hoel? We will celebrate the 75th Sturgis Rally with a couple of rides and rally highlighting Indian motorcycles — old and new — and hope you can join us in the fun.

My close friend Mike “Kiwi” Tomas will lead a five-day ride from SoCal to Sturgis in memory of his son Ross Tomas. He welcomes everyone to join along regardless of what you ride.

For more info please contact Info@KiwiIndian.com. I will be leading another group of classic and modern bikes on a three-day back road ride from the National Motorcycle Museum in Anamosa, Iowa. The pace and roads will be “old bike friendly.” Latest info at AIMag.com or on our Facebook page. The focus for both rides will be classic and modern Indian motorcycles (in respect to the founders of the Sturgis Rally), but riders of all years and makes of motorcycles are welcome to join us on the road.

In addition, we have created a free event at the Buffalo Chip on Tuesday, August 4th, for all Indian motorcycles (new and old) and other classic American motorcycles. A full-fledged bike show and free field events. You will kick yourself if you miss this, so mark your calendar and plan to be at The Chip during Sturgis’ 75th rally. More details next issue.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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Increasing Motorcycle Engine Size

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

Want more power? Get a bigger engine. It’s as simple as that. And though increasing your engine’s displacement isn’t the only way to get more power, it’s a very effective one. Since an engine’s displacement is the result of two factors — the bore of its cylinders and the stroke of its pistons — increasing either one (or both) will make your engine larger and more powerful.

The displacement of a piston engine is the total swept volume of all the engine’s cylinders. A cylinder’s swept volume is the area that the piston travels (sweeps) over as it moves up and down its cylinder, called its stroke. The displacement (area) of a cylinder depends on its diameter (bore) and length (stroke). To compute a cylinder’s displacement, you plug these two measurements into the formula: bore x bore x 0.7854 x stroke. The number 0.7854 is a constant value that’s needed to make it all work out correctly.

Once you have the swept volume of  a cylinder, you multiply that number by the amount of cylinders the engine has, which for V-twins is two, to get the total cubic-inch (or cubic centimeter for you metric lovers) displacement of the engine. If you use the bore and stroke measurements for a TC 103, you’ll get (3.875″ x 3.875″ x 0.7854″ x 4.375″) x 2 for a total of 103.19″ (1,690 cc).

The purpose of a big-bore cylinder kit is to dramatically increase the diameter of an engine’s cylinder bores. There are two ways to do this: buy bigger bore cylinders or machine the bore of the stock cylinders larger. The stock TC 88 and TC 96, and 883 Sportster cylinders have walls about 1/4″ thick, so they can be bored out to the same diameter as some big-bore kit cylinders and still thick enough for safe engine operation.

Changing the bore of an engine to increase its displacement should not be confused with an overbore, which is done during an engine rebuild to remove imperfections in the cylinder’s walls. While an overbore does change the bore size slightly, it’s a very small amount – 0.005″ or so, depending on the amount of damage to the cylinder walls. Once you’ve changed the bore of the cylinders, even if it’s just 0.005″ over for a rebuild, you need to
install new, equally larger pistons and rings.

As for engine longevity, there are no problems associated with increasing an engine’s bore, other than the additional stress and strain that the increased power will put on all the engine and powertrain components. However, the size of the cylinder holes in the crankcases, called the cylinder spigots, limits how much you can increase the cylinder bores. That’s why builders who want very large displacement engines must also increase the engine’s stroke. And that’s what we’ll cover in another issue.

See you on the road,

Chris Maida

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Motorcycle Life Cycles?

buzz-headshot

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

Most of us go through what i might call motorcycle life cycles.You know, those times in our life when we are fortunate enough to get another motorcycle. Typically, we go through a similar routine in the lead-up to buying our next motorcycle.

Fantasize. Come on, we all do it. You fantasize about what motorcycle you’d buy if you won the lottery. Inspiration comes from everywhere — magazine articles, riding buddies, or something you saw on the road or Internet. Your fantasy might be a shiny new model, something you’ve lusted after for years, or a cool classic like the one your uncle used to ride.

Research. Okay, so you didn’t win the lottery, but you’re in a position to buy a motorcycle in the near future. I’ve never understood those people who walk in and buy a motorcycle right off the showroom floor just because they like the way it looks. For most of us, a motorcycle purchase is a major event worth researching before we commit that kind of money.

Shop. There are so many ways to shop for a motorcycle. Franchise dealerships, used bike shops, eBay, craigslist, word of mouth, and auctions to name a few. Hopefully, you did your research to know what you like, and roughly how much you should pay for it. This applies to the motorcycle and to the accessories that come with the bike or that you want to add.

Riding. This is my favorite part. If you did your research right you got a great motorcycle that you look forward to riding — a lot. Some people take great pride in cleaning, polishing, and shining their bike. I much prefer to spend that time in the wind.

Customizing. Some riders keep their motorcycles 100 percent bone-stock as they rack up the miles. And that’s fine for them. I prefer to customize my bikes to my taste. I prefer saddlebags on most bikes as I like to carry tools, a rain suit, and extra riding gear when on the road. Others like tall handlebars, wild custom wheels, or powerful sound
systems. To each his own.

More riding. After all is said and done, we do it all for the riding. You decide how much to customize your ride, and, over time and miles, your tastes could change. No matter what, though, motorcycling is all about the riding. And that’s the motorcycle life cycle.

All DIY & Harley Tech Magazine
we get a lot of compliments and requests for more tech and DIY articles. Most riders are natural tinkerers, and our machines are fun and easy to tinker with. In response, we created a magazine called American Iron Garage. We published our first issue, for the newsstand only in 2011, and it sold better than expected.

These all-tech magazines are a lot of hard work to produce, but this year we will publish three issues of the all-tech American Iron Garage and invite you to be a part of it. Did you and your pals do the work customizing or restoring your bike? Is it magazine-worthy? We are looking for garage-built bikes to feature. Before-and-after photos of your bikes are popular, too, so please send well-lit, in-focus photos to us at Garage@AmericanIronMag.com along with a brief description of what you did and how we can reach you.

The next issue of American Iron Garage goes on sale April 7. To keep your costs down, it is not included in your American Iron Magazine subscription. You can buy a print copy at most stores or a digital version at Zinio.com.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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