How Motorcycle Engine Power Is Produced

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

Whenever you get around a group of riders, compression ratios, cubic inches, and cam lifts, as well as a multitude of other modifications, are discussed and compared, along with the resulting torque and horsepower numbers. But why does increasing an engine’s cubic inches (known as its displacement) result in more power? And why does installing the highest lift cam you can buy usually result in less power being produced?

All engine performance mods, from something as basic as bolting on a freer-flowing air cleaner to exotic systems like superchargers or nitrous oxide, are designed to do one thing: get more air/fuel mixture over the piston, so it can be ignited — hopefully when it will do the most good — and burned as efficiently as possible. Period. The heat energy released by burning gasoline and oxygen is what the piston and associated parts turn into the mechanical energy needed to turn the rear wheel. Think about it: it’s not the size of the cam’s lobes that allow an engine to develop more power, it’s how well a specific cam works with the engine’s other components to get as much air/fuel mixture into the cylinders as possible for each combustion event.

But getting the cylinders filled is not the only factor in getting the most from what you have. When the ignition system fires the spark plugs to burn the mixture and how efficiently that mixture burns also plays a big part in how much power will be produced. The spark plug should ignite the air/fuel mixture before the piston starts on its way back down the cylinder on its power stroke. This is done so the mixture has time to ignite and burn. The piston is driven down the cylinder by the pressure produced in the combustion chamber by the rapidly burning fuel and air. To get the most power, you want the piston just past the top of its compression stroke by the time the mixture has burned to the point where the now-expanding gases can push their hardest on the piston, driving it down the cylinder on its power stroke. As for having an efficient burn, the more completely you burn the air/fuel mixture, the more power you’ll get from it.

To get a very efficient burn, the fuel must be completely atomized and thoroughly mixed with air in the right proportions before it’s ignited by the spark plug. The fuel and air are initially mixed in the engine’s intake system. However, for a very efficient burn, the fuel and air should be mixed again in the combustion chamber just before it’s ignited. The combustion chamber and piston design on Evos and Twin Cams do this by turbulently mixing the air/fuel mixture as it’s compressed into the combustion chamber by the rising piston. Just for the record, you don’t want turbulence in the intake or exhaust tracts; laminar flow is the way to go in the ports.

See you on the road,

Chris Maida

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Winter Love? Motorcycle Maintenance And Seasonal Bike Prep

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SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

Yeah, you know she’s a looker. and wherever you go with her, she turns heads. Do I need to remind you never to take her for granted? She has real needs, and if you don’t meet those needs, there is a good chance she’ll have to go to someone else for satisfaction.

So when’s the last time you spent any real garage time with your bike? At the end of the last riding season did you push it to the back of the garage and maybe eventually throw a bed sheet over her? Or did you clean, wax, and prep her for the winter hibernation?

I admit it. Like many busy riders, my typical end of riding season prep routine is lacking. Some of my friends wash, wax, and detail their bikes from top to bottom every month. As much as I admire their handiwork and beautiful, shiny machines, I’ve never been like my friends. More typical for me is a quick wipe down and, perhaps, an annual wax and buff session. Regardless of my lackluster cosmetic regimen, I take the mechanical issues seriously. I maintain the batteries and keep them properly charged year-round. I make sure the engine oil is fresh and the tires are pumped up. I also add some fuel conditioner to the gas tank when parked for any time.

As the temperatures drop outside, and the snow levels climb, I look forward to cranking up the heat and the radio in my garage and shutting off my cellphone. I roll the first bike up onto my lift, strap it down, and take my time inspecting, cleaning, and adjusting it from top to bottom and front to back. Sometimes it takes less than an hour, and other times most of a day to do one bike. I own several great old motorcycles. So, if the weather and road conditions are not rider friendly this process can keep me busy for much of the winter season.

Whatever your plans, if you park your bike for more than a few weeks you will be a lot happier in the long run spending some time with it now — even if you’re not a great mechanic. At least clean, dry, and wax your bike, and plug a charger into the battery every couple of weeks. If not, when the weather turns, she might need to go to someone else (like a local Harley mechanic) for satisfaction.

Motorcycle Magazine Back Issues
we frequently get calls from our readers asking where they can get copies of our current or older magazines. Perhaps we reviewed or featured their bike a few months back, or they wanted a particular tech or install
article for reference. Or they just wanted to fill holes in their collection. Well, we have good news for you. Most, but not all, back issues of our various magazines are available to purchase in print at GreaseRag.com. You can also purchase great motorcycle books and other bike-related goodies there.

We’ve published lots of motorcycle magazines in the last 26 years, at regular frequency and special issues to commemorate Harley anniversaries. Some are specific to Harleys and others not. We have managed to keep
a box or two of most of them for our readers in need. And, once they are sold out, they are gone forever.

The Harley-specific magazines are American Iron Magazine, American Iron Garage (all-tech), American Iron Motor­cycle Bagger, American Glory (Harley anniversary issues), the short-lived Hot XL (specifically for Sportsters and Buells), Hottest Custom Harleys, and the one-shot American Iron Baggers & Bobbers special.

We also have most of the issues of the collectible Indian Motorcycle Illustrated, as well as old issues of Motorcycle Tour & Travel and RoadBike, and our terrific new Motorcycle, Rides & Culture.

In addition to all these magazines GreaseRag.com also offers special deals and bundled packages of books or
magazines at discount. So check it out.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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Progressive International Motorcycle Show: NYC Wrap-Up

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By Jon Langston

The Progressive International Motorcycle Shows revved up New York City this past weekend, and tens of thousands motorcycle fanatics from across the spectrum of enthusiasts, from teenagers in racing suits to fat guys in Santa suits, rolled into the Jacob Javits Convention Center on the West Side of Manhattan. The TAM Communications family of magazines – American Iron Magazine, Motorcycle Bagger, and Motorcycle Rides & Culture – were all on hand to check out the new bikes, products, and gear, and revel in the two-wheeled camaraderie only real riders can provide.

While there was little in the way of motorcycle premieres, most of the major manufacturers displayed some sort of a neo-retro theme in their booths. Ducati pulled the in-person wraps off its fun new Scrambler, which is a modern-day throwback to its 60s/70s forebear of the same name – and at around $9K should easily compete with Triumph’s Bonneville line for retro/standard dominance. And in addition to unveiling its tasty new S1000XR (available next spring, it’s essentially the same bike as the ballyhooed 199hp S1000RR superbike, with a more standard structure and GS-like upright riding position), BMW showed off a gorgeous vintage Boxer-powered chopper that was so clean and minimalistic it had even American Iron Editor Chris Maida agape.

A host of Gold Wings through the ages at the Honda booth displayed Big Red’s seminal interstate mile-eater from its inaugural 1975 model year through the 300 millionth Honda ever produced, a Gold Wing that rolled off the assembly line just a couple of months ago. Yamaha, meanwhile, tried to direct attention toward its new Star Bolt C-Spec, but its SR400 retro-thumper got just as many admiring looks as Yamaha’s shameless (but admittedly superior, performance-wise) Sportster facsimile.

Triumph pointed out some nice new versions and customs from its Bonneville line, while KTM put the onus on its new entry-level 390 Duke and two-stroke dirtbikes. Its 390 race-only and streetbike was also on display.

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Indian had its fine new Scout front and center, along with the stars-and-stripes custom Wall of Death version – the same one ridden in the “thrill arena” that was set up in the Indian’s Lazelle Street booth in Sturgis last summer. Indian also brought out Dirty Bird Concepts and land speed record holder Karlee Cobb from Klock Werks to pull the wraps off of a couple of nicely customized Scouts. Indian’s new Tourmaster dresser was also on full display. Meanwhile, Victory Motorcycles, Indian’s stable mate at Polaris, highlighted its excellent charitable work by showing off the custom Cross Country bagger Laura Klock and the Klock Werks crew donated to Helping with Horsepower, a group of fabricating kids from South Dakota’s Pine Bush High school. Members of the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, another Victory charity, posed with the kids and the bike, which set a land speed record at Bonneville in September.

Across the aisle, Polaris also showed off its new 173-horsepower Slingshot, a three-wheeled contraption with 5-speed manual transmission and impressively manageable MSRP. While most states will register the Slingshot as a motorcycle (so use of a helmet is required, while seat belts are only recommended), it’s advisable to check with your local DMV before plunking down your $20K. Whether you consider it ridden or driven, the Slingshot looks like a real kick to pilot.

IMS-photos-sl-14In addition to the guest speakers such as legendary travel/moto-journalist Peter Starr and racers Josh Hayes and Ricky Gadson, stunt shows, and myriad other attractions, one of the more intriguing displays at the New York IMS was Motus Motorcycles’ racing MSTR, the fastest production pushrod motorcycle in the world as evidenced by its record setting runs at the Bonneville Motorcycle Speed Trials in August. Motus also displayed its 2015 MST series of American-made sportbikes, powered by the Baby Block V-4. We cannot wait to get one under us.

The Progressive International Motorcycle Shows continues its tour after a break for the holidays with stops in Washington, DC January 9-11; Miami, January 16-18; Dallas, Jan 23-25, Cleveland, January 30-February 1, Minneapolis, February 6-8, and Chicago, February 13-15.

More American-Made Motorcycles Hitting The Market

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SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

Halloween is right around the corner, but looking at the latest issue of American Iron Magazine, I don’t feel we have a trick or treat deal going on. I can’t think of any specific trick in the motorcycle world, but lots of treats.

Let’s start with the growing assortment of terrific American-made motorcycles hitting the market. Harley is still offering plenty of the traditional air-cooled, pushrod, V-twin motorcycles in all shapes and sizes, plus V-Rods, and the new Street 750 and 500. And who knows about the electric motorcycles The Motor Company has been teasing us with this year? Victory continues to expand its line of motorcycles to include three baggers, two all-out touring models, and four cruisers. Indian has added a top-of-the-line touring Roadmaster and an exciting new Scout to the three existing Chief models. And EBR (Erik Buell Racing) is also expanding its offerings to three models, including the new, lower-cost (under $17,000) 1190SX American street tearer.

So, what does all this mean to those of us who prefer to ride American motorcycle brands? Well, let’s start with the obvious: (1) competition is heating up here. And healthy competition benefits consumers with greater choices and improved products. (2) No matter what your style or tastes, there is something for everyone going into 2015. Entry-level Street 500 and 750, muscle cruisers like the Indian Scout, Victory Gunner, and Harley V-Rods, standards like the Harley Softail, Indian Chief, and Victory Hammer 8-Ball; racers include any of the EBR machines, or long-distance tourers like the Harley Ultra, Indian Roadmaster, or Victory Cross Country Tour (I still can’t get used to the Victory Vision’s adical look). Let’s not forget Harley Sportsters and Dynas, the other Indian Chiefs, and more.

So, even before you start pulling out the manufacturer and aftermarket parts catalogs to figure out how to personalize your new motorcycle, the choices are already a bit overwhelming. Even to the longtime rider/builder/customizer. My advice for people in the market for a new ride? Go to the dealer and look at the machines that catch your fancy. Sit on them in the showroom and see how they feel. Read all you can about the particular model and ask if you can take a test ride (some dealers encourage this).

I love a big sign I saw at one dealer that read “Your wife called and said it’s okay to buy it.”

I don’t know if the quality and quantity of new bike choices will ever get better. And if it does, you can always trade in or trade up. So what’s keeping you from pulling the trigger on a shiny new bike?

Florida Sunshine
October in New England can be dicey for us. It might be perfect riding weather or it might be terrible. It’s the same in most of the northern regions and Canada. So a great way to finish the traditional riding season is to aim your headlight south and roll your bike down to Florida. Why? Well, I can think of a couple excellent reasons (other than the terrific riding weather). They are Biketoberfest in sunny Daytona Beach, and the trade and consumer AIMExpo in nearby Orlando. Both run from October 16 to 19, and both are worth checking out.

Congrats To Mr. & Mrs. Walksler  
I’d like everyone to join me in congratulating my friend Matt Walksler (of Wheels Through Time and What’s In The Barn? fame) for convincing the lovely Hailey MacDonald, one of the greatest young ladies in Maggie Valley, North Carolina, to marry him.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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Neglected Pre-Ride Motorcycle Maintenance Part 2

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

In the last issue, I wrote about how many owners routinely neglect their bike’s tires. This time around, we’ll look at the second important area I see many owners overlooking: their brake systems. Checking the brake pads, brake lines, and rotors takes only a few minutes, since they’re out in the open. Thankfully, these components only need to be checked every 2,500 miles. However, if you ride less than 1,000 miles a year, don’t go by the bike’s mileage in regard to the brake lines, since time is the enemy here as much as mileage. Every six months should be sufficient.

To check the brake pads, look at where both pads contact the rotor. If the metal baseplate of the pad is close (under 1/16″) to touching the rotor, change the pads. Inspect the rubber section of the brake lines for cracks, the metal areas for rust. Needless to say, you don’t want to see either one. If you do, replace the lines. For the rotors, look for bluing or grooves on either side of the rotor. Slight grooves in the rotor are normal, deep grooves are not. Also make sure the bolts are tight. You don’t have to pull out a torque wrench to check the hardware, just put a tool on them and see if they move easily. If they don’t, they’re good to go.

The last brake maintenance item is a bit more involved: changing the brake fluid. This is the area I see neglected the most. Thankfully, you only swap out the brake fluid every two years if your bike uses DOT 3 or 4. That’s how long it takes DOT 3 or 4 to absorb enough moisture to become a problem. Water inside the brake system corrodes the brake lines and such from the inside and can cause a failure even though things look fine on the outside. Just for the record, you can put DOT 4 in a DOT 3 system, but don’t put DOT 3 in a DOT 4 system. Also, DOT 5 and DOT 5.1 are not the same. Don’t interchange them!

Of course, while you’re looking at the brake system, which also includes checking the brake fluid level, you can also check the axle nuts, wheels, etc., but a long checklist is, I think, the main reason most riders don’t check anything. Personally, I recommend inspecting a few different items each time you’re about to fire off the engine. This trip it’s the brake system, next time it’s the wheels and axle nuts, etc. Sure, the best way is to check everything every time you plan on going for a ride, but that’s not going to happen in most cases. If it’s all or nothing, it’s safer, in my opinion, to check a section of your bike each time you plan on going for a ride. That said, you should always check the tires before each ride!

See you on the road.

Chris Maida

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2015 Indian Scout Ride Review – Preview

2015-Indian-Scout-previewNEW BIKE REVIEW by Dain Gingerelli

Noah Webster and company can add a new definition to the word overachiever to their lexicon. And the definition is exactly three words long: Indian Motorcycle Company. Consider that less than three years after mother ship Polaris Industries purchased the left-for-dead carcass of a company in early 2011, the first three Indian preproduction prototypes (Chief Classic, Vintage, and Chieftain) appeared in the metal at the 2013 Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. By October of that same year, the first production models were on dealer showrooms, waiting to be sold. Less than a year later, the Roadmaster (see AIM issue #315) appeared. Overachieving, indeed.

But then the overachieving got kooky, because to kickstart the week-long Sturgis rally for 2014, Indian unveiled the all-new-for-2015 Scout at what was certainly one of the wildest new-model launches in memory.

For our full ride review and photos pick up American Iron Magazine‘s
November issue #316.

The PRINT EDITION hits newsstands October 14.
Subscribe and receive the next issue weeks before it goes on-sale.

The DIGITAL EDITION is available for instant download TODAY!

74th Annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally Preview

2014-Sturgis-previewEVENT by Dain Gingerelli

To borrow from the late Rodney Dangerfield’s comedy shtick: I tell you, I went to the Buffalo Chip to watch a rock concert and a bike rally broke out.

Of course, I exaggerate, but as one of the most famous motorcycle rallies in America approaches its 75th anniversary next year, music has become an integral part of the week-long Sturgis Motorcycle Rally that’s headquartered in South Dakota’s Black Hills. You want to watch a top-rate rock concert? Then check in at the Buffalo Chip any night during rally week, or visit one of the other major watering holes near or in Sturgis and you’ll be treated to equally top-rate live music from a number of top regional or national rock-and-roll and blues bands.

But while rockin’ sounds fill the air throughout the week, the real draw for this rally continues to be the bikes and the people who ride them.

For full event coverage and photos pick up American Iron Magazine‘s
November issue #316.

The PRINT EDITION hits newsstands October 14.
Subscribe and receive the next issue weeks before it goes on-sale.

The DIGITAL EDITION is available for instant download today.

 

2015 Victory Motorcycles New Bike Specs – Preview

2015-Victory-Motorcycles-previewNEW BIKE SPECSby Steven Wyman-Blackburn

The fact that Polaris industries’ first venture into the motorcycle world turned 15 years old last year is a pretty big deal. Victory’s base of operations is rooted in a country that prides itself for developing some of motorcycling’s firsts (some argue best) products, and putting them on the shelf among the oldest brands in the industry.

Having to roll out against such competition, Victory had to shout loudly in order to be heard. Victory’s 3/20-of-a-century celebration in 2014 was spearheaded by an anniversary edition of its Cross Country Tour model (a motorcycle which, as Victory made sure to proclaim, sported the largest-ever storage space at 41.1 gallons). This was soon followed by the continuation of the Ness series with Arlen Ness checking off the Cross Country bagger from his Ness/Victory bucket list. However, this bike received extra attention from all three Ness generations — another industry first.

For our complete New Victory specs and photos pick up American Iron Magazine‘s
November issue #316.

The PRINT EDITION hits newsstands October 14.
Subscribe and receive the next issue weeks before it goes on-sale.

The DIGITAL EDITION is available for instant download today!

Chain Tensioner Blues

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM by Chris Maida, Editor

TAKING AIM, by Chris Maida, Editor

I’ve been getting a lot of letters from readers concerned about the cam chain tensioners in their Twin Cam engines. They want to know at what mileage the fiber shoe on the tensioners will wear out. Unfortunately, there’s no simple answer to this question, since it depends on a few factors.

For starters, tensioner shoe wear is tied to engine rpm, not mileage. An engine spinning at 2500 rpm when the bike is in second gear and going 30 mph is wearing out its tensioner shoes the same amount as when the bike is in fifth and going 60, and yet the bike is traveling twice as many miles. This means a bike ridden mostly around town will wear out its tensioner shoes at a lower mileage than a bike ridden mostly on the highway.

Another factor to consider is whether your bike has the spring-loaded tensioners or the newer hydraulic units. The spring type is original equipment in all 1999-2006 Twin Cams, except 2006 Dynas, which got the hydraulic units that year. All 2007 to present Twin Cams have the hydraulic tensioners. This is important because the spring-loaded tensioners wear out much faster than their hydraulic counterparts. The spring-loaded tensioners are always applying the same amount of pressure onto the cam chain and, therefore, the tensioner shoes.

The hydraulic tensioners apply pressure based on engine oil pressure. When the engine is idling or at low power settings, engine oil pressure is low, so the tensioners are not applying much pressure to the chains, keeping shoe wear to a minimum. This is why the spring-loaded tensioners usually wear out their shoes in 15,000-30,000 miles while the hydraulic units have been lasting anywhere from 30,000 to 70,000.

You can check the outer tensioner’s shoe by pulling off the cam cover, which brings us to the final factor to remember. The inner tensioner shoe, on both spring and hydraulic tensioners, always wears out faster than the outer one. If the outer shoe is three quarters worn, the inner one is probably gone or just about to go.

To change the inner tensioner and its shoe, you have to pull the entire cam support plate assembly out of the engine and take this assembly apart. This is why many owners take this opportunity to upgrade to the new-style hydraulic units and cam support plate. (Why go into your engine again in 20,000 miles or so?) It’s also a good idea to upgrade to the new-style oil pump at this time. Many owners also put in a set of performance cams that don’t require any headwork at this time, since the only additional cost is the cams themselves, a fuel tuner, and the tuning time, but that’s a whole different issue.

See you on the road.

Chris

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This column originally appeared in issue #314 of American Iron Magazine.

(Interested in tackling this project? Our friends at Fix My Hog have a video that lays it all out for you. Click here to check it out.)

 

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Introducing The 2015 INDIAN SCOUT

2015-Indian-Scout-8 2015-Indian-Scout-7Sturgis, S.D. — Indian Motorcycle®, America’s first motorcycle company, today announces the launch of the 2015 Indian Scout™, a contemporary yet classic interpretation of  one of motorcycling’s most famous and coveted bikes. With a starting US MSRP of $10,999 and a DNA that will appeal to riders of multiple skill sets and abilities, the new Indian Scout was unveiled Saturday night to a gathering of press, VIPs and celebrities at the 2014 Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Rally attendees are encouraged to be among the first to test ride the 2015 Indian Scout at the Indian Motorcycle Demo Experience on I-90 @ Exit 30 in Sturgis, South Dakota, which runs through Saturday, August 9.

2015 Indian Scout
Weighing in at a wet weight of 558 pounds – lightest in its class – the 2015 Indian Scout was derived from a clean sheet design, creating a potent and precise middle-weight cruiser that carries forward the spirit of innovation that made it one of the most storied bikes of all time. Boasting advanced technologies, design and engineering innovations, it offers a breakthrough chassis design featuring a lightweight and rigid cast aluminum frame coupled with a low 25.3-inch seat height for exceptional comfort, balance and maneuverability. Powered by an all-new and proprietary liquid-cooled, 69 cubic inch, 100 HP V-twin engine, the 2015 Indian Scout is powerful yet approachable. Its low seat height, low center of gravity, maneuverability and lightweight and compact design makes the Scout appealing to riders of all sizes and experience levels while the high horsepower and superior handling make it a bike that will thrill even the most experienced riders.

This is the first truly new Indian Scout in more than 70 years and marks the return of the legendary bikes that conquered the infamous “Wall of Death” and carried the legendary “Indian Wrecking Crew” motorcycle race team to multiple victories. Technology and designs derived from Scout models played a significant role for Allied Forces in World War II and a 1920 Indian Scout earned the title of the “world’s fastest Indian” as proven by Burt Munro in 1967.

“Over the course of 30 years of countless innovations, racing wins, world records and industry firsts, the Scout has earned its reputation as a versatile, multifaceted bike that appeals to just about every rider and every riding style, with superior handling, balance, performance and craftsmanship,” said Steve Menneto, VP of Motorcycles for Polaris Industries. “Our designers and engineers have taken that heritage and those characteristics and fused it into the 2015 Indian Scout, and we think just about everyone who rides this incredible bike is going to feel like it was built just for them.”

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Superior Design Details for Unmatched Beauty and Control
The new Scout was designed from the ground up for a superb balance of comfort and control, delivering a superior riding performance for both newer and experienced riders. It offers:

• The look of a classic “rigid triangle” design that is synonymous with original Scouts, coupled with a set of premium coil over monotube rear shocks that deliver exceptional ride, handling and comfort

• A 25.3 inch seat height, 61.5 inch wheelbase and 5.3 inch ground clearance, delivering a confidence-inspiring 31 degrees of lean angle and low center of gravity, along with exceptional high and low speed maneuverability

• A premium, genuine tan leather solo bucket seat, making the 2015 Indian Scout pure Indian and the only brand to offer this seating as standard

A Reimagined Engine for Power and Precision
The 2015 Indian Scout is powered by an all-new, in-house designed and proprietary 69 cubic inch V-twin engine that combines all the design, power and reliability elements that made the original Scouts unbeatable and mates it with state-of-the-art components and modern technologies. Smooth, flawless power throughout the power band featuring:

• Liquid-cooled design for 100 HP of pure power, along with enhanced durability and reliability

• Out of respect for the legendary Scouts of the 1920s, 30s and 40s, the 2015 Scout carries forward classic engine design cues with purposeful styling that honors both form and function

• Closed loop fuel injection and drive-by-wire throttle actuation mated to a 6-speed overdrive transmission for peak torque of 72 ft./lbs. of torque at 5900 RPM

Pricing & Availability
The 2015 Indian Scout is available for immediate ordering at a starting US MSRP of $10,999 with expected delivery in dealerships across North American in late 2014. Pre-orders may be placed on www.IndianMotorcycle.com; visit “Scout’s First Run” to learn more. It is available in Thunder Black, Indian Motorcycle Red, Silver Smoke (matte finish) and Thunder Black Smoke (matte finish).

Sturgis Rally attendees are encouraged to experience the 2015 Indian Scout at the Indian Motorcycle exhibit at 3rd & Lazelle St., or by taking a demo ride at the Indian Motorcycle Demo Experience, I-90 @ Exit 30. Visit the Indian Motorcycle Sturgis event page for details.