Harley’s new 107 cubic inch, Milwaukee-Eight

Buzz Kanter EIC

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter 

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

I  can’t believe it’s been 17 years since The MoCo last invited us for an exclusive look and ride of a new generation of Harley engine, the TC88, which we named the Fathead. Seventeen years!

You have already seen the cover of this issue of American Iron Magazine. Harley’s engineers, designers, and marketing teams have pulled the cover off a totally new engine design to carry Harley Trikes and Touring bikes into the future.

We are honored that American Iron Magazine readers will be the first to read about this exciting new engine design officially named the Milwaukee-Eight. Riders like to give Harley engines nicknames. When I first saw photos of this engine I thought the top end looked rather muscular, so how about we call it the Musclehead?

In brief, the all new 107″, single cam, four-valve-per-head Milwaukee-Eight will be available in all 2017 Trikes and Touring models. The bikes without lowers will use the oil-cooled version. Touring bikes and Trikes with lowers will use the oil and water-cooled designs, but the non-Touring models will retain the current Twin Cam powertrains. The limited-production CVO models will now be powered by a larger 114″ version of the all new Milwaukee-Eight.

The Harley team tells us the new Milwaukee-Eight engine idles lower, runs cooler, is faster, and gives better gas mileage than today’s Twin Cam. It’s quite an engineering feat, and one well worth waiting for.

For a lot more detail, please read our exclusive article and photos starting on page 46 for more information.

Sons of Speed Boardtrack Racing
love the romance and excitement of old motorcycles and the thrills and spills of real antique motorcycle racing? Check out the Sons of Speed boardtrack-style racing near Daytona on October 15.

American V-twin motorcycles from the teens through 1924 will be racing on the half-mile, banked asphalt of New Smyrna Speedway with no brakes, no transmissions, and no clutches! Join me, Billy Lane, and a cast of characters this Biketoberfest as we try to recapture the days of old, when racers were bold.

I will be on my 1915 Harley-powered reproduction boardtracker, representing Team American Iron. Other racers include Billy Lane (event promoter) on a 1913 Indian, Rick Petko (of Discovery’s American Chopper) on a 1913 Indian, Xavier Muriel (musician with Buckcherry) on a 1919 Harley, Jay Allen (of Broken Spoke) on a 1913 Thor, Shelley Rossmeyer-Pepe (Rossmeyer H-D) on a 1915 Harley, and Warren Lane (Atomic Metalsmith) on a 1919 Indian, and possibly others.

I expect the bikes will be showcased around town before the event. The races start around 1 pm, Saturday, October 15, at the New Smyrna Speedway (3939 Florida Route 44). Tickets are available at EventBrite.com and at the gate. Hope to see you there. This is going to be wild!

American Iron’s Greaserag.com
we get requests every week for back issues of our various magazines, motorcycle books and collectibles, and for AIM swag. We sell our back issues, while supplies last, and other interesting, motorcycle-related stuff at GreaseRag.com or call 203/425-8777, ext. 114 to order. Watch for limited-time special discounts!

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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Race On Sunday, Sell On Monday?

Buzz Kanter EIC

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter 

AMA Class C racers on tankshift 45 cubic-inch flatheads

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

Talk to any of the motorcycle old timers and eventually they all get around to discussing a deep-rooted rivalry. It was between the two American motorcycle powerhouses, Harley-Davidson and Indian, on the racetracks and in the showrooms. I have heard and read about the epic battles on the sand of Daytona Beach, the rough dirt tracks near Loudon, New Hampshire, and the unforgiving hard pack of Springfield, Ohio. And the subsequent battle to get riders into the dealerships.

The parking lots at 1940s and early ’50s motorcycle race events were tightly packed with Harley flatheads, Knuckleheads, and Panheads, side by side with Indian Chiefs, Scouts, and occasional Fours. The riders proudly wore shirts or caps proclaiming their ride of choice. In the pits and on the tracks were Indian Scouts and Harley WRs. These were the fierce competitors of AMA Class C racing on tankshift 45 cubic-inch flatheads. Yes, I am going back more than 60 years, but whatever embers from this fierce
competition that still glow are about to get fanned into a powerful blaze.

After decades of dominating the dirt tracks of America with the all-conquering XR-750, Harley-Davidson recently announced a new race platform based on the 750cc liquid-cooled Street motorcycle. The XG750R broke cover at the Sacramento Mile where factory rider Davis Fisher finished the Semi in third place. Unlike just about all other 45-degree, air-cooled V-twins in Harley’s history, the radical new G (which used to be Harley’s designation for the Servicar trike) is a liquid-cooled, four-valve, 60-degree design. Could this be something to watch for in the future?

Right on the heels of Harley’s announcement of a new generation dirt track racer, Indian pulled the covers off an all-new race powertrain rumored to have been designed and built in less than a year! Say hello to the Indian FTR750 racer, powered by a liquid-cooled, four-valve, DOHC V-twin engine. I know the last Indian factory racer was built before I was born. I believe it was Indian model 648 Big Base Scout, built in very limited numbers in 1948 specifically to beat the Harley team in the important Daytona Beach races that year. Indian won the race, but it was the end of head-on, on-track competition between the factory teams of Harley and Indian. Until now.

Most of us know how racing can benefit the brand. First and foremost, race bikes are cool. They should be designed with nothing that does not help them go faster, handle better, or stop properly. Second, competition breeds improvements. Lessons learned on the track often has great applications for the street. Third could be phrased “Race on it Sunday, sell it on Monday,” if motorcycle dealers were open on Mondays. Enthusiasts like to buy and ride the bikes they see race and win, even if they are buying a motor­cycle with little in common other than tank badges and a similar general look.

HD-Indian-wars-columnFor the first time in decades, Harley is showing serious commitment, gambling with a new powertrain to replace the XR750, and Indian has opened its corporate checkbook wide to re-enter dirt track racing after more than six decades. Could this lead to a rebirth of popularity in a sport that has, frankly, been in steady decline for too long? I sure hope so. Either way, I do know it will benefit all enthusiasts with stronger and better products for years to come. And I can’t wait to see the Harley and Indian teams out on the mile track, hanging it all out and fighting for the win.

If you are interested in learning more about the Harley/Indian rivalry I strongly recommend buying a copy of the long-out-of-print book Alan Girdler’s The Harley-Davidson and Indian Wars at Greaserag.com

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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DIY Tech & Kickstart Motorcycles

Buzz Kanter EIC

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter 

George could do it faster; but he wanted to share all he knew

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

More American Iron
When American Iron Magazine first appeared in 1989, it was created to offer something of everything of interest to Harley riders and be family friendly. The overall quality of content, design, and even paper was higher than most other Harley-oriented magazines at the time, and we still work hard to offer you the best possible package.

We tried different approaches over the years. Some were quite popular, and others weren’t. Using this trial and error approach, while paying attention to what our readers and industry leaders tell us, we continue to fine-tune the mix of articles and subjects. The popular blend includes reviews of new bikes and products, tech and DIY, feature and classic bikes, tours and events, and a few quirky and unexpected articles.

Over the years we have recognized a large and growing audience of Do It Yourselfers (DIY) who enjoy wrenching on their rides. It might be to better understand them, personalize them, or just to save a few bucks. For these people, we can never offer too many tech, install, and DIY articles in any one issue of American Iron Magazine. With that in mind, a few years ago we created an all-tech special newsstand issue called American Iron Garage. It was so popular that we increased it to two issues a year, then up to three issues last year. Now, we are increasing American Iron Garage to six issues a year and offering subscriptions for those who can’t find the magazine locally or just love a great deal. And, yes, we will continue to offer great tech and DIY here in American Iron Magazine, too.

To subscribe to our all-tech and DIY American Iron Garage in print (only $19.97 a year in US print or digital worldwide) call 877/204-0774 or sign up at www.aimag.com. For a digital subscription, please go to AIMag.com.

Motorcycle Kickstart Classic Ride
if you love old motorcycles or are just looking for a fun group of motorcycle enthusiasts to ride with, our Motorcycle Kickstart Classic ride will meet up at Wheels Through Time in Maggie Valley, North Carolina, on Thursday, July 28. We will have a number of local rides around the greater Maggie Valley area Friday, July 29. We then ride as a group over to Chesnee, South Carolina, on Saturday, July 30, for a fun-filled day with the local AMCA (Antique Motorcycle Club of America) Legends Chapter. It’s up to each rider if he wants to stay in Chesnee for the night or ride back to Wheels Through Time.

You are running out of time to preregister, which you can do online at AIMag.com or by calling Rosemary at 203/425-8777 x114 with a credit card.

RIP George Yarocki
It is with deep sadness that i must say good-bye to my old friend and motorcycle mentor, George Yarocki. Everyone who met 88-year-old George quickly warmed up to this kind, humble, and generous gentleman.

George loved old motorcycles and old machinery in general, but his deepest passion was for the short-lived (1928-31) Indian 101 Scout. George was never one to withhold hard-to-find knowledge.

He was an amazing source of motorcycle information and mechanical understanding. He insisted owners work on their own bikes at Ft. Yarocki, with him looking on, providing advice and encouragement. I did this with my 1931 Indian 101 Scout more than once. George could have done the jobs faster, but he wanted to share all he knew so that it would carry through the years and generations and not be lost with his passing. We will miss George. He was one in a million.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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American Iron Magazine Publisher Buzz Kanter On American Restoration TV Show

Our very own Buzz Kanter, Editor-in-Chioef of American Iron Magazine, is on this week’s American Restoration show on the History Channel this Friday, March 5 at 9 PM EST.

Buzz teams up with his old friend Dale Walksler of Wheels Through Time to tear apart Buzz’s very rare 1929 Harley JDH Two-Cam motorcycle. Buzz rode a different 1929 Harley JDH across the US from New York to San Francisco on the 2012 Motorcycle Cannonball endurance run.

You will not believe what Dale and his crew does with the bike in a month. It blew Buzz away and will amaze you too. Check it out this Friday March 5.

No More Motorcycle Gas Pains?

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SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

I was riding streetbikes in the 1970s when the first gas and oil crisis hit America.  If you’re of a certain age, you probably can recall the OPEC embargo and subsequent gas rationing that followed. Our government decided for us that we had to line up for hours at gas stations to fill up our tanks. To handle the high demand for the low volume of available gasoline, our odd- or even-numbered license plates determined what days we could buy gas.

That was the first time I recall the experts predicting a mass migration from huge gas-guzzling American cars to more fuel-efficient motorcycles. From that time on, whenever we experience significant spikes in gas prices we also hear the chorus of experts predicting more motorcycle riders. But the reality is, for whatever reason, something else happens.

So now America is blessed with the opposite situation in terms of available fuel. Gas prices are down — way down — because supply is up. Should we expect the so-called experts to predict fewer motorcycles on the road? Not at all. So what’s going on here?

I’m convinced that most people, at least in North America, do not ride motorcycles for the fuel efficiency, especially when the electric and hybrid cars use less gas and oil than even the most frugal motorcycles. Are electric motorcycles in our future? You bet. They are offering some fast and terrific-looking machines, but I don’t feel their sales will hit critical mass until battery technology improves significantly.

However, I’m convinced that most people buy motor­cycles, especially big traditional American-built bikes with V-twin engines, because they are fun to ride. We all have our own reasons why we ride, but I’d bet my 1948 Panhead that, for many of us, it’s for fun and the feeling of freedom on the road.

Indian-Rally-ad-2015Ride With Us
We like to meet our readers, plus we like to ride, so this is the best of both worlds. Our next event is our Motorcycle Kickstart Classic, which is slated for the last weekend of May in Maggie Valley, North Carolina. It’s open to all makes, models, and age motorcycles, but we insist that electric-start bikes ride at the back of the pack to pick up any parts that fall off the old bikes up front. All riders and passengers must register in advance. Details at AIMag.com.

Then on June 20, we head to Ham Lake, Minnesota, for the Patriot Ride (ThePatriotRide.org), a relatively new, but fast-growing ride and bike show. Our magazines will sponsor the bike shows and, we plan to feature some of the bikes in our pages.

Sturgis
did you know the sturgis rally began in 1938 as a local race put on by Indian Motocycle dealer Pappy Hoel? We will celebrate the 75th Sturgis Rally with a couple of rides and rally highlighting Indian motorcycles — old and new — and hope you can join us in the fun.

My close friend Mike “Kiwi” Tomas will lead a five-day ride from SoCal to Sturgis in memory of his son Ross Tomas. He welcomes everyone to join along regardless of what you ride.

For more info please contact Info@KiwiIndian.com. I will be leading another group of classic and modern bikes on a three-day back road ride from the National Motorcycle Museum in Anamosa, Iowa. The pace and roads will be “old bike friendly.” Latest info at AIMag.com or on our Facebook page. The focus for both rides will be classic and modern Indian motorcycles (in respect to the founders of the Sturgis Rally), but riders of all years and makes of motorcycles are welcome to join us on the road.

In addition, we have created a free event at the Buffalo Chip on Tuesday, August 4th, for all Indian motorcycles (new and old) and other classic American motorcycles. A full-fledged bike show and free field events. You will kick yourself if you miss this, so mark your calendar and plan to be at The Chip during Sturgis’ 75th rally. More details next issue.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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AI Garage 1930s Harley VL and Sidecar Sneak peak (Video)

AI-Garage logo 1The crew at American Iron Magazine recently rescued this 1930s Harley VL and sidecar, which had been sitting in a basement for 10 years, and brought it over to Retrocycle to get her all back up to snuff for a story in a future issue of American Iron Garage, the all-tech, all-DIY Harley magazine special.

“It’s over painted, over chromed, and has wrong year parts,” says American Iron Magazine/Motorcycle Editor-in-Chief Buzz Kanter about the VL. “It hasn’t been started in years. We do know the motor is a 1930, but there are questions about what the other parts are.”

The bike will be featured in the Summer issue of Garage. The article will show readers how to get an old bike back on the road by noting what the crew at Retrocycle do to make this classic motorcycle ridable again. The Summer issue, the second of three Garage installments for 2015, hits newsstands 6/15.

The Spring issue is currently on newsstands and is also available via digital delivery on Zinio.com.

Watch the video below as Buzz shows us the current state of the bike.

Retrocycle is located at 1 Mars Ct. Unit 3, Boonton, NJ 07005.

Motorcycle Life Cycles?

buzz-headshot

SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

Most of us go through what i might call motorcycle life cycles.You know, those times in our life when we are fortunate enough to get another motorcycle. Typically, we go through a similar routine in the lead-up to buying our next motorcycle.

Fantasize. Come on, we all do it. You fantasize about what motorcycle you’d buy if you won the lottery. Inspiration comes from everywhere — magazine articles, riding buddies, or something you saw on the road or Internet. Your fantasy might be a shiny new model, something you’ve lusted after for years, or a cool classic like the one your uncle used to ride.

Research. Okay, so you didn’t win the lottery, but you’re in a position to buy a motorcycle in the near future. I’ve never understood those people who walk in and buy a motorcycle right off the showroom floor just because they like the way it looks. For most of us, a motorcycle purchase is a major event worth researching before we commit that kind of money.

Shop. There are so many ways to shop for a motorcycle. Franchise dealerships, used bike shops, eBay, craigslist, word of mouth, and auctions to name a few. Hopefully, you did your research to know what you like, and roughly how much you should pay for it. This applies to the motorcycle and to the accessories that come with the bike or that you want to add.

Riding. This is my favorite part. If you did your research right you got a great motorcycle that you look forward to riding — a lot. Some people take great pride in cleaning, polishing, and shining their bike. I much prefer to spend that time in the wind.

Customizing. Some riders keep their motorcycles 100 percent bone-stock as they rack up the miles. And that’s fine for them. I prefer to customize my bikes to my taste. I prefer saddlebags on most bikes as I like to carry tools, a rain suit, and extra riding gear when on the road. Others like tall handlebars, wild custom wheels, or powerful sound
systems. To each his own.

More riding. After all is said and done, we do it all for the riding. You decide how much to customize your ride, and, over time and miles, your tastes could change. No matter what, though, motorcycling is all about the riding. And that’s the motorcycle life cycle.

All DIY & Harley Tech Magazine
we get a lot of compliments and requests for more tech and DIY articles. Most riders are natural tinkerers, and our machines are fun and easy to tinker with. In response, we created a magazine called American Iron Garage. We published our first issue, for the newsstand only in 2011, and it sold better than expected.

These all-tech magazines are a lot of hard work to produce, but this year we will publish three issues of the all-tech American Iron Garage and invite you to be a part of it. Did you and your pals do the work customizing or restoring your bike? Is it magazine-worthy? We are looking for garage-built bikes to feature. Before-and-after photos of your bikes are popular, too, so please send well-lit, in-focus photos to us at Garage@AmericanIronMag.com along with a brief description of what you did and how we can reach you.

The next issue of American Iron Garage goes on sale April 7. To keep your costs down, it is not included in your American Iron Magazine subscription. You can buy a print copy at most stores or a digital version at Zinio.com.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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Winter Love? Motorcycle Maintenance And Seasonal Bike Prep

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SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

Yeah, you know she’s a looker. and wherever you go with her, she turns heads. Do I need to remind you never to take her for granted? She has real needs, and if you don’t meet those needs, there is a good chance she’ll have to go to someone else for satisfaction.

So when’s the last time you spent any real garage time with your bike? At the end of the last riding season did you push it to the back of the garage and maybe eventually throw a bed sheet over her? Or did you clean, wax, and prep her for the winter hibernation?

I admit it. Like many busy riders, my typical end of riding season prep routine is lacking. Some of my friends wash, wax, and detail their bikes from top to bottom every month. As much as I admire their handiwork and beautiful, shiny machines, I’ve never been like my friends. More typical for me is a quick wipe down and, perhaps, an annual wax and buff session. Regardless of my lackluster cosmetic regimen, I take the mechanical issues seriously. I maintain the batteries and keep them properly charged year-round. I make sure the engine oil is fresh and the tires are pumped up. I also add some fuel conditioner to the gas tank when parked for any time.

As the temperatures drop outside, and the snow levels climb, I look forward to cranking up the heat and the radio in my garage and shutting off my cellphone. I roll the first bike up onto my lift, strap it down, and take my time inspecting, cleaning, and adjusting it from top to bottom and front to back. Sometimes it takes less than an hour, and other times most of a day to do one bike. I own several great old motorcycles. So, if the weather and road conditions are not rider friendly this process can keep me busy for much of the winter season.

Whatever your plans, if you park your bike for more than a few weeks you will be a lot happier in the long run spending some time with it now — even if you’re not a great mechanic. At least clean, dry, and wax your bike, and plug a charger into the battery every couple of weeks. If not, when the weather turns, she might need to go to someone else (like a local Harley mechanic) for satisfaction.

Motorcycle Magazine Back Issues
we frequently get calls from our readers asking where they can get copies of our current or older magazines. Perhaps we reviewed or featured their bike a few months back, or they wanted a particular tech or install
article for reference. Or they just wanted to fill holes in their collection. Well, we have good news for you. Most, but not all, back issues of our various magazines are available to purchase in print at GreaseRag.com. You can also purchase great motorcycle books and other bike-related goodies there.

We’ve published lots of motorcycle magazines in the last 26 years, at regular frequency and special issues to commemorate Harley anniversaries. Some are specific to Harleys and others not. We have managed to keep
a box or two of most of them for our readers in need. And, once they are sold out, they are gone forever.

The Harley-specific magazines are American Iron Magazine, American Iron Garage (all-tech), American Iron Motor­cycle Bagger, American Glory (Harley anniversary issues), the short-lived Hot XL (specifically for Sportsters and Buells), Hottest Custom Harleys, and the one-shot American Iron Baggers & Bobbers special.

We also have most of the issues of the collectible Indian Motorcycle Illustrated, as well as old issues of Motorcycle Tour & Travel and RoadBike, and our terrific new Motorcycle, Rides & Culture.

In addition to all these magazines GreaseRag.com also offers special deals and bundled packages of books or
magazines at discount. So check it out.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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To subscribe to the PRINT edition, click here.

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Motorcycle Cannonball 2014, Part I – Preview

TEAMAM~open

From l., Buzz Kanter, Cris Sommer Simmons, Pat Simmons, and Paul Ousey, ready to ride!

By Buzz Kanter, photos by Michael Lichter, Jim Dohms, and Buzz Kanter

Part I: 3,938 Miles of Blood, Sweat & Gears

The ride is almost 4,000 miles from Daytona Beach, Florida, to Tacoma, Washington. If the bikes — all 1936 and older machines —have mechanical issues, other riders could help without losing points, but team mechanics can’t help as they follow a different route from point to point. If you think this is fun, you’re right. If you think it’s easy, think again.

CANNONBALL 14This was the third running of the Motorcycle Cannonball, a timed endurance event for antique motorcycles that will push even the most experienced rider to his physical and mechanical limits. Some 101 motorcycles were officially recognized as starting the event in Daytona Beach. Seventeen days and 3,938 miles later, 72 of us were considered finishers in Tacoma. Along the way, we encountered some of the most stunning and mind-numbing experiences a motorcyclist is ever likely to encounter. While most of the riders, including me, were focused on getting our antique motorcycles and ourselves across the country with minimal drama, some were focused on winning this event.

Yes, this was a competition with a complete set of rules and scoring procedures. In terms of scoring, you earn a point for every mile ridden provided you make it to the start and finish lines at the scheduled times. If you get lost, run out of gas, or break down, you can do what you need to make it up as long as no one from your support team helps you. If you switch riders, you lose points. If you swap engines, you lose points. If you leave a hosted event early, you lose points. 7 Burning HarleyIn addition, if you DNF (do not finish) more than seven days, or the last day, you were disqualified and listed as DNF for the entire event. In the event of a tie (and there were many), Class I motorcycles (700cc or smaller engine displacement) beat Class II (701cc to 1000cc), which, in turn, beat Class III (1001cc or larger displacement). After that, the next tiebreaker was the age of the motorcycle: the older one beats the newer one. In case of a tie where the bikes are in the same class and the same age, the tiebreaker is the age of the rider, with the older rider beating the younger one. Got it?

After covering the planned 3,938 miles, an impressive 32 riders covered them all on course, but, due to scoring issues, only 24 were considered as perfect scores. The others were penalized points for various reasons. This year’s overall winner was …

 

 

Riveted yet? The full version of this story appears in Issue #318 of American Iron Magazine, on sale 12/9/14!

Subscribe to the print magazine today or get your digital subscription for mobile devices via Zinio!

More American-Made Motorcycles Hitting The Market

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SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

Halloween is right around the corner, but looking at the latest issue of American Iron Magazine, I don’t feel we have a trick or treat deal going on. I can’t think of any specific trick in the motorcycle world, but lots of treats.

Let’s start with the growing assortment of terrific American-made motorcycles hitting the market. Harley is still offering plenty of the traditional air-cooled, pushrod, V-twin motorcycles in all shapes and sizes, plus V-Rods, and the new Street 750 and 500. And who knows about the electric motorcycles The Motor Company has been teasing us with this year? Victory continues to expand its line of motorcycles to include three baggers, two all-out touring models, and four cruisers. Indian has added a top-of-the-line touring Roadmaster and an exciting new Scout to the three existing Chief models. And EBR (Erik Buell Racing) is also expanding its offerings to three models, including the new, lower-cost (under $17,000) 1190SX American street tearer.

So, what does all this mean to those of us who prefer to ride American motorcycle brands? Well, let’s start with the obvious: (1) competition is heating up here. And healthy competition benefits consumers with greater choices and improved products. (2) No matter what your style or tastes, there is something for everyone going into 2015. Entry-level Street 500 and 750, muscle cruisers like the Indian Scout, Victory Gunner, and Harley V-Rods, standards like the Harley Softail, Indian Chief, and Victory Hammer 8-Ball; racers include any of the EBR machines, or long-distance tourers like the Harley Ultra, Indian Roadmaster, or Victory Cross Country Tour (I still can’t get used to the Victory Vision’s adical look). Let’s not forget Harley Sportsters and Dynas, the other Indian Chiefs, and more.

So, even before you start pulling out the manufacturer and aftermarket parts catalogs to figure out how to personalize your new motorcycle, the choices are already a bit overwhelming. Even to the longtime rider/builder/customizer. My advice for people in the market for a new ride? Go to the dealer and look at the machines that catch your fancy. Sit on them in the showroom and see how they feel. Read all you can about the particular model and ask if you can take a test ride (some dealers encourage this).

I love a big sign I saw at one dealer that read “Your wife called and said it’s okay to buy it.”

I don’t know if the quality and quantity of new bike choices will ever get better. And if it does, you can always trade in or trade up. So what’s keeping you from pulling the trigger on a shiny new bike?

Florida Sunshine
October in New England can be dicey for us. It might be perfect riding weather or it might be terrible. It’s the same in most of the northern regions and Canada. So a great way to finish the traditional riding season is to aim your headlight south and roll your bike down to Florida. Why? Well, I can think of a couple excellent reasons (other than the terrific riding weather). They are Biketoberfest in sunny Daytona Beach, and the trade and consumer AIMExpo in nearby Orlando. Both run from October 16 to 19, and both are worth checking out.

Congrats To Mr. & Mrs. Walksler  
I’d like everyone to join me in congratulating my friend Matt Walksler (of Wheels Through Time and What’s In The Barn? fame) for convincing the lovely Hailey MacDonald, one of the greatest young ladies in Maggie Valley, North Carolina, to marry him.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

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To order back issues, visit Greaserag.com.

To subscribe to the PRINT edition, click here.

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