Sons of Speed From A Racer’s View

Professionally I am a motojournalist. For fun I am a vintage motorcycle enthusiast. And I was able to combine the two this past week at the first ever Sons of Speed race at the tail end of Daytona Bike Week. As the only journalist crazy enough to get out on a high banked race track on a 100-year-old motorcycle with no brakes, suspension, transmission or clutch, I wanted to share some of my experiences and observations here. Most journalists hang around the pits or track looking for a good story, I wanted to experience racing Sons of Speed for myself.

Buzz Kanter being interviewed with his 1915 Harley racer at the first ever Sons of Speed races at New Smyrna Speedway

I will be going into a lot more detail about the behind the scenes and actual Sons of Speed races in the pages of American Iron Magazine, but I wanted to share a bit of the story here and now.

These motorcycles are all direct drive, meaning if the engine is running, the rear wheel is spinning. So we could not practice anywhere but literally on the track. The first day of practice we all were trying to figure out how to ride the bikes and the fastest way around the track. We’d push the bike up on the high banking – often with the spearkplugs out to make pushing easier. Then we roll down the banking to spin the engine enough to start. The starting was brutal on the bike and rider as you are trying to balance the bike and get it to fire as you lift up your feet and get them on the pegs.

Rhett Rotten sliding out at the Sons of Speed practice. He broke 2 ribs and was back racing the next day

To our surprise there was only one accident on the track. And that was when Rhett Rotten, a Wall of Death rider, suffered a rear tire blow out. He and the bike slid, jumped and bounced down the track at close to 60+ mph. He broke two ribs and after a visit to the local hospital was back on the track for the races.

All the Sons of Speed racers on race day. Notice the crowded stands.

When we finally got out to race Saturday, they had us in four heat races. The plan was the winners of the four move to the finals. And the 2nd place racers in each heat raced for a spot in the main.

I am not going to go blow by blow here, but in the first heat Billy Lane jumped out at the start and took the lead with me following and two others behind me.

Buzz Kanter (white leathers) and Billy Lane (black leathers) at the Sons of Speed races.

I was able to stay within 10 bike lengths or so of Billy until the last lap when I was able to slide past him and hold the lead for the win.

Made it to the main where I was able to hold on to 4th place with Brittney Olsen taking the win with her fast bike and smooth riding. Full report with lots more photos in an upcoming issue of American Iron Magazine. If you don’t currently subscribe, do it now to make sure you get the issue with the race coverage AND save money too. SUBSCRIBE & SAVE

2017 Sons of Speed Racer

Here’s what you’ll see Buzz racing in his Team American Iron leathers at the New Smyrna Speedway in Daytona. Direct-drive–that means no clutch, no gearbox. Tug the wheel while in the stand and off they go!

1915 Harley Special

Inside A Sons Of Speed Boardtrack-Style Racer

Text by Billy Lane

Photos by Jim Arbogast

What do you envision when someone describes a motorcycle as a boardtrack racer? The term has been applied to so many styles of motorcycles over the years, we’d like to define the term for you and share this replica racer AIM Editor in Chief Buzz Kanter will be competing on in March for Team American Iron.

Button on left grounds the magneto to slow down. Right side throttle to speed up. Hand operated oil pump on left tank, gas on the right.

There is no denying that motorcycle racing rapidly advanced the development of the motorcycle engine. Roads in the first decade of the 20th century were not conducive to high speeds. Worse, the surfaces were so rough they often destroyed the motorcycles that rode over the dirt, mud, and gravel surfaces. But that seldom mattered when two sporting riders found themselves side by side on the same road.

Visionaries like Jack Prince saw the potential of a smooth surface for high-speed motorcycle racing. So they modeled their banked board racetracks after the wildly popular bicycle velodromes. The first recognized motorcycle board track, built in 1910, was the Los Angeles Motordrome. And, as you might expect, it didn’t take long for motorcycles, designed for speeds of 25 mph on the road, to exceed 100 mph on the boards.

This new sport was so popular, motorcycle boardtrack racing quickly influenced the young manufacturers and privateers to increase speed through greater engine horsepower, creating some of the most ingenious and beautiful engine designs by way of their makers’ desire for glory on the racetrack.

Billy tailored each specific frame to accept a variety of old motors. Here’s Buzz’s 102-year-old motor.

Billy bent the top tube of Buzz’s frame to mimic the lines of an original 1915 Harley-Davidson, and then bent and welded a set of 0.045″ aluminum fuel and oil tanks

But progress did not happen without problems. Rough, unpaved roads broke the brazed and soldered frames, forks, fuel tanks, and wheels of early motorcycles. Owners would remove and repurpose the engines, trashing the remainder of the motorcycle in favor of lighter and sometimes stronger designs for the track. Boardtrackers were some of the first motorcycle racers in organized events.

Stripped of all unnecessary weight or parts, they were raw performance. Big muscular engines clamped low in skinny keystone frames with braced forks and drop bar handlebars; slim wheels and skinny tires with no brakes to get in the way or slow you down; magneto ignitions, a skinny seat, and no fenders. Direct drive removed any need for transmission or clutch. The only controls on true boardtrack racers were the twist grip throttle (either cable or rod actuated), a magneto kill button, and a hand pump to override the oiling system. These were purpose-built, fire-breathing, all-out race machines!

A century later, we have a few surviving engines patiently waiting for their revival. The last boardtracks were closed in the early 1930s when motorcycle racing was relegated to flat dirt tracks. Dirt track racing required more horsepower at speeds well below those achievable on the boards.

I created Sons of Speed (SOS) to put the engines that survived two world wars and The Great Depression back on the banked track. Sons of Speed maintains as much of the raw purity of motorcycle boardtrack racing as possible, the way it was done a century ago, while promoting the sharing of information, education, diversity of brand, and safety that was absent during the sport’s peak in 1915.

At the core of Sons of Speed are vintage 1000cc twin-cylinder, air-cooled motorcycle engines from manufacturers like Excelsior, Harley-Davidson, Indian, Merkel, P.E.M., Reading-Standard, and Thor. I, along with several carefully chosen others, have rebuilt these engines to withstand the rigors of high-speed racing. Most of the troubles associated with early engines were due to carburetion and ignition irregularities, which we have overcome by improving carburetor design and modifying or replacing the magneto ignitions.

To carry these original engines around the track, I designed and built a modern version of early motorcycle half-mile racing chassis. My Sons of Speed frames employee a universal keystone design, in which most early V-twin motorcycle engines fit. The various manufacturers’ engines are bolted in the identical keystone frames via engine cradle plates. By simply replacing the aluminum engine cradle plates, an Indian or Excelsior Sons of Speed race engine can quickly be swapped into a Harley-Davidson- or Reading-Standard-powered Sons of Speed chassis. Each chassis shares the same countershaft and rear drive sprockets, forks, handlebars, wheels, seats, and tires. The only significant variation in the chassis is the shape of the fuel/oil tanks, which I created to mimic the original style of the original Flying Merkel, Harley-Davidson, or Thor designs.

Our use of lightweight aluminum parts wherever possible helps translate the limited horsepower of the early engines up to track speed. I constructed my Sons of Speed frames and forks from 1020 mild steel, seamless tubing that is drawn over a mandrel. All joints are coped and hand-fit before TIG welded in the jig to ensure joint strength. Aluminum wheel hubs feature modern sealed wheel bearings, supporting rims with 28″ clincher racing tires made from Firestone’s original molds. The result is simple, reliable, and relatively affordable race bikes, complete with interchangeable components, and all in a package that weighs less than 170 pounds.

To build a half-mile banked wooden track would cost over a million dollars—well beyond the Sons of Speed budget. But we do have a lease with New Smyrna Beach Speedway for March 17 and 18, 2017, during the 76th Daytona Beach Bike Week. The Speedway is a half-mile asphalt track with 20-degree banking, well suited for Sons of Speed racers. The Speedway’s surface may not be made of wood, but it offers so much more in the way of speed and excitement than a dirt track. We could have more than 20 Sons of Speed racers ready to go in March, so the action will be fast and furious.

In addition to racing, I am currently working on organizing a vintage custom car and motorcycle show at the track, with vendor spaces and camping. For advance tickets (tickets are limited), videos, and information, please go to our Facebook page (Choppers Inc) and follow us on Instagram @Choppers.Inc.

Shown here is Buzz Kanter’s 1915 Harley-Davidson-powered Sons of Speed racer. RetroCycle, in Boonton, New Jersey, rebuilt Buzz’s 102-year-old engine and shipped the engine to me after some test runs. I bent the top tube of Buzz’s frame to mimic the lines of an original 1915 Harley-Davidson, and then I bent and welded a set of 0.045″ aluminum fuel and oil tanks.

Prior to building Buzz’s racer, I’d built and been running another 1915 Harley-powered SOS racer belonging to Shelly Rossmeyer-Pepe. Shelly’s and Buzz’s racers are virtually identical, except for the tanks and a few small details. Both bikes share identical sprocket ratios from front-to-rear, seating, footpeg, and handlebar locations.

The original boardtrack racers ran with the pedal cranks fixed in place and used as foot rests for the rider. Since pedal cranks are of no use to us, I eliminated them from the SOS racers. The footpegs are in an exaggerated configuration, like a pedal crank, with the left peg forward of center and the right peg aft, near the rear axle. Because the riders sit so far rearward on these bikes, the unusual foot positioning makes it easier to lean our body weight inward and forward over the front wheel, which is necessary to maintain both control and speed in the turns.

My race bikes are direct-drive machines, with no clutch and no gearbox. So starting them takes some thought. We can start them with a tug on the rear wheel on a stand, or by dropping in from the top of the banked track. These engines fire to life immediately, sending us into turn number one at an alarming pace. Braking is achieved by a combination of throttling down or ignition kill and steering the bike to fight gravity on the track’s banked surface.

Throttling up on another bike from behind through a turn at 70 mph—with no brakes—will make your heart beat harder than the thumping engine a few inches beneath your chest. Because these racers are geared tall for high speeds, they decelerate fairly quickly with engine braking. But from top speed, it might take up to a half-mile to come to a complete stop. AIM

Find this story and more great articles in Issue #347 of American Iron Magazine.

Going to Daytona Bike Week – Motorcycle Packing Tips

If you are packing up your motorcycle to head down to Daytona Bike Week this week, here is a great list of suggestions and ideas on how and what to pack.

Tips to pack for a motorcycle tour

TRAVEL TIPS FROM EXPERIENCED TOUR RIDERS

  • Lightweight synthetic clothing – such as T-shirts and underwear – can be washed in a hotel sink and dried overnight (cotton fabrics take too long to dry in this manner).
  • Zipper-lock plastic bags of various sizes can be used for organizing items in saddlebags and duffle bags. They can make it easier to find and retrieve particular items without unpacking your entire motorcycle. Use the one-gallon size to pack one day’s worth of clothes – jeans, undergarments, and shirt. This makes it easier to unpack just what you need.
  • Don’t fold your clothes – roll them. They take up less space that way.
  • Pack items that have more than one use. A multi-tool is handier than a basic pocket knife.
  • When traveling with other riders, conserve space by comparing packing lists and eliminating duplicate items.
  • When traveling (two-up) with a spouse or “significant other”, can you share a tube of toothpaste and shampoo for a week.
  • On long trips, consider bringing your rattiest underwear (or other clothing), then just throw it away when you’re done with it!
  • Don’t forget power cords and chargers for your cell phone and other electronic devices.
  • Check the cargo weight limits of your bike – as wells as the bags and racks – and adjust tire pressure and suspension accordingly.
  • Few things are as easy to pack as money or credit cards. If you’re struggling with whether or not to bring a particular item, consider simply buying it on the road if you need it.
  • If you watch the ounces, the pounds will take care of themselves. When possible, lighter is better.
  • When loading your bike, keep as much weight as possible close to the bike’s center of gravity. That means low and toward the tank, distributed evenly from side to side.
  • A day or two before you leave, do a dry run. Pack the bike and go for a short ride, then adjust the load as needed.
  • If you’re camping, set up your tent once or twice before you leave (and don’t forget to waterproof it). Practice setting it up in the dark.
  • With your bike fully loaded, check your headlamp to make sure it’s properly aimed.
  • Pack all your cold weather and raingear (raingear on top) no matter what time of year it is.
  • Plastic bags make great boot liners if you forgot your gaiters. If you forgot your rain gloves, rubber dishwashing gloves are cheap and easy to buy.
  • A small towel can be wrapped around your neck during a rainstorm to keep water from running down your back – and doubles as a shop rag.

Sons Of Speed Antique Motorcycle Boardtrack-Style Racing

There is a good chance that no one alive has ever actually ridden a real motorcycle boardtrack race. The last one we are aware of was a century ago. While the Sons of Speed race is not technically a full on boardtrack race, it is as close any is practicle in today’s world.

Buzz Kanter’s 1915 harley. Skinny and fast, you can see how narrow these stripped down racers are.

Inspired by early twentieth-century boardtrack racers, the Sons of Speed race echoes the stripped down, wide-open approach to motorcycle riding. The inaugural race takes place during Daytona Bike Week at New Smyrna Speedway’s half-mile, banked racetrack.

It will feature up to twenty riders in a number of heat races. The winners of the heats will advance to a championship round. Each racer will sit astride identical hand-built racing chassis holding pre-1925 1000cc American V-Twin engines, and most racers will customize their machines by fabricating handlebars, exhaust, fenders, foot pegs, and fuel/oil tanks.

Nothing that does not add speed. These 100 year old boardtrack racers were pretty basic and fast!

Sons of Speed is the idea of Billy Lane, who has spent countless hours in the last year pulling together the bikes, rides, location and all the logistics needed to make it happen. And the Sons of Speed race will happen in New Smyrna Speedway Friday, March 17 (practice) and Saturday, March 18 (the actual races) as part of the annual Daytona Bike Week.

“I’m both thrilled and humbled by the enthusiasm we’re seeing for Sons of Speed,” says Billy Lane. “It has really taken off–so much excitement. There’s talk of expansion at Sturgis and Daytona Biketoberfest later in the year. Everyone has been so generous and enthusiastic–it’s all a bit mind blowing.”

While the majority of the race bikes are Harley powered, others are signed up to race, including Indian, Pope, Thor and others.

American Iron Magazine is proud to be associated with this first running of the Sons of Speed event. Our Publisher Buzz Kanter, a long time vintage motorcycle enthusiast, owner and racer, will be piloting his 1915 Harley-Davidson, which is featured in the issue of American Iron Magazine that goes on sale at the start of Daytona Bike Week. If you can not find a copy locally, they are for sale at www.Greaserag.com.

American Iron Magazine will cover the Sons of Speed event from many perspectives – Buzz Kanter as a racer on the track, as well as staff writers and photographers covering the action. We will share it on-line and in print. Subscribe today to get your copy of the magazine to read all about it at SUBSCRIBE & SAVE

For more information and on-line purchase of tickets please click on Sons Of Speed

Official Daytona Bike Week Bike Build Underway

American Iron Magazine is building the Official Daytona Bike Week giveaway bike and we’d like to thank all of the generous vendors and parts manufacturers that helped make it a reality. Each week we’ll showcase some of the companies on our website and social media, leading up to Daytona Bike Week in March, 2017.

The build began with a story in American Iron Magazine Issue #344 where we assess the status of our plainjane 2010 Harley-Davidson Ultra starting point. The bike was mechanically sound, with low mileage for its age, but was suffering from some flaws in the aesthetics department. This didn’t pose a problem, as we planned to transform the look of the bike and make it much more appealing for the ultimate prize bike winner.

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All the wrenching, painting, and assembly duties will be handled by Rich, Eric, and Monica from Street Stuff Motorcycle of New England, in Norwich, CT. This is the second time Street Stuff has been involved with building the Official Daytona Bike Week bike, and they were stoked to get started.

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In issue 345 we’ll start bolting on some cool Arlen Ness billet engine goodies shown here. Ness wanted to showcase its new “10-Gauge” line of billet aluminum engine and chassis parts. Most all of the engine covers, front and rear floorboards, fork tubes, 13” Bagger Apes and handgrips came from Arlen Ness.

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You can win the Official Daytona Bike Week Bike by getting your ticket at OfficialBikeWeek.com. Tickets are $50 each and only 4500 tickets will be sold. Get one before they run out!

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ArlenNess.com

StreetStuffCycle.com

OfficialBikeWeek.com

AIMag.com

Victory Motorcycles Rippin’ and Roarin’ Through Daytona Bike Week

Octane Burnout

Victory Motorcycles roared through a full schedule of events during the 75th Anniversary of Daytona Bike Week, March 5-12, with the excitement of the new Victory Octane, the setting of a world record, the launch of a forthcoming world record attempt, a packed and active display area and demo rides, stunt expositions, racing sponsorships, organized tours and much more.

Events started at Orlando World Dragway, where Victory Stunt Team rider Joe “Vertical” Dryden achieved a 2.23-mile Guinness World Record Burnout atop his Victory Octane. The feat was later celebrated at the famed Main Street Station, at a party hosted by Bryan Fuller from TV’s Naked Speed and featuring special guests Dryden and partner Tony Carbajal, Red Bull extreme athlete Aaron Colton announcing his new Victory Octane project series, and live music by Raw Adrenaline.

Main Street Station also served as the host site for Victory’s salute to the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA) foundation. Victory Motorcycles is in its third year as a strategic partner to IAVA, and has provided financial contributions and helped raise awareness for the organization by providing exhibit space at major motorcycle events such as Daytona Bike Week, the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, and motorcycle shows from coast to coast.

Located at Daytona International Speedway, the Victory Motorcycles display area remained a bustling hive of activity all week on the heels of the recent unveiling of both the Victory Octane muscle bike and Magnum X-1 Stealth Edition bagger. Victory Motorcycles offered enthusiasts test rides on the full 2016 line-up of motorcycles – including the latest models – exhibited new accessories and apparel, showcased exciting expositions by the Victory Stunt Team of Carbajal & Vertical, and astounded attendees with the control skills of Victory Police Motorcycles demonstration team.

Later in the week, Swiss endurance rider Urs “Grizzly” Pedraita rode a lap of the Daytona International Speedway track to kick off his own Guinness World Record. Always a major Bike Week event, the Victory Owners Ride this year incorporated Grizzly’s world record start. Hosted by Volusia Motorsports, the event culminated in more than 200 Victory owners gathering at Daytona International Speedway to ride one lap of the Daytona 200 road course and escort Grizzly out of town for the first part of his journey of circumnavigating six continents in less than 100 days aboard his Victory Cross Country Tour.

Ending the anniversary of Daytona Bike Week festivities, Victory Motorcycles served as the presenting sponsor of the 75th running of the Daytona 200 at Daytona International Speedway – the crown jewel of Daytona Bike Week and America’s most historic motorcycle race. As part of the sponsorship, the new Victory Octane, the ultimate musclebike with the heart of a racer, fulfilled pace bike duties by leading the field of 600cc sportbikes off the grid for pre-race warm-up laps and during caution periods.

“Victory Motorcycles came to Daytona Beach with a mission to ignite the American motorcycle scene,” said Alex Hultgren, Marketing Director for Victory Motorcycles. “We had great success with the Victory Octane by not only setting a World Record right out of the gate, but by hosting thousands of demo rides for visitors who came to the Victory display. The kickoff for the newest era for Victory Motorcycles was a success by any measure.”

Indian Motorcycle Kept Riders Rolling During The 75th Daytona Bike Week

Indian-motorcycle-in-daytona-1Eight days of festivities including the on-site introduction of the Indian Springfield, vintage & custom displays, demo rides, racing, organized tours & special events

MINNEAPOLIS (March 22, 2016) — Seventy-five years after Ed Kretz dominated the first motorcycle race on the sands of Daytona Beach, FL., Indian Motorcycle®, America’s first motorcycle company, again left a historic mark on Bike Week.

Among Indian Motorcycle’s highlights during the 75th Anniversary of Daytona Bike Week, held March 5-12, were the introduction of a new motorcycle model, vintage & custom bike displays and unveilings, racing, demo rides, organized owner rides and more.

The week started with the launch of the new Indian Springfield, a motorcycle offering classic styling blended with thoroughly modern technology for a purist’s take on both touring comfort and urban versatility. At the same time, Indian Motorcycle and Jack Daniel’s announced the availability of Limited Edition Jack Daniel’s® Indian® Springfield™ and Indian® Chief® Vintage motorcycle models. This special production run of 150 motorcycles was designed in conjunction with Brian Klock and his inspired team at Klock Werks Kustom Cycles in Mitchell, S.D., and sold out in just eight hours. Unit #001 of the limited edition series, an Indian Chief Vintage, was held back to be auctioned at Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas on October 13-15 at the Mandalay Bay resort, with all monies from the auction benefitting Jack Daniel’s Operation Ride Home. Unit #150, an Indian Springfield, was gifted to Klock by Jack Daniel’s and Indian Motorcycle in recognition of his contribution and continuing support of many initiatives in the motorcycle community.

Indian-motorcycle-in-daytona-3The first custom to be built based on the 2016 Indian Springfield also turned heads in Daytona. Unveiled during a special media event at the famed Racing’s North Turn beachside restaurant, the ‘Frontier 111’ crafted by Azzkikr Custom Baggers of Phoenix, Ariz., showcases builder Len Edmondson’s exceptional talents for building award-winning and fully functional artwork. With this bike, his acute attention to detail and Azzkikr style offer a truly show-stopping example of a thoroughly modern retro bagger that features classic lines via contemporary, artistic flare and took the Springfield to a new level in customs.

On Tuesday, March 8, Indian Motorcycle fans enjoyed live music, food & refreshments as the winner of the Project Scout contest was announced at the legendary Boot Hill Saloon on Daytona Beach’s Main Street. Of more than 40 custom submissions and three finalists, the Boardtracker built by Motos Illimitées of Terrebonne, QC, Canada, won the judges’ trophy as well as the Editor’s Choice Award. The Fusion, built by Indian Motorcycle Charlotte of Lowell, NC, won the Fan’s Choice Award and Ol’ #71, built by Heritage Indian Motorcycles of Northwest Arkansas, took home the Roland Sands Builder’s Choice Award.

Mid-week took the Indian Motorcycle brand to the track, where Roland Sands and the Roland Sands Design SuperHooligan Indian® Scout® Sixty dirt trackers battled handlebar-to-handlebar at Volusia Speedway Park, with racer Stevie Bonsey picking up the checkered flag on his first ride on a SuperHooligan Indian Scout Sixty dirt tracker, Sean Guardado finishing 2nd and Aaron Frank crossing the line in 3rd aboard another Indian Scout Sixty SuperHooligan. Two days later, after a full evening of Hooligan races in front of 5,000 spectators at Daytona International Speedway, an eight-lap final atop the .25-mile dirt oval saw three Team RSD Indian pilots fill the SuperHooligan podium with Sands crossing the line 1st, Jamie Robinson finishing 2nd and Cameron Brewer following up in 3rd. The RSD SuperHooligans made their most recent appearance March 19 at IV Flat Track Del Mar in Del Mar, Calif.,and will go on to an appearance April 8 at the Hand Built Show in Austin, TX.

Indian-motorcycle-in-daytona-2Throughout the week, Indian Motorcycle entertained Bike Week attendees at the Indian Motorcycle display in Daytona International Speedway’s Midway area with new motorcycles, engine cutaways, talks with designers and engineers, custom & vintage bikes, accessories and apparel, and a chance to win a 2016 Indian Scout Sixty. Nearby, guests were invited to ride the entire 2016 line-up of Indian motorcycles – including the new Indian Springfield – to compare, and decide which models best suit their riding style. The result was a record-setting number of demo rides for the brand.

On Thursday, March 10, the Indian Motorcycle Riders Group joined participants from the Veterans Charity Ride program, a motorcycle therapy-based ride from Los Angeles to Sturgis that made its debut last summer, in an organized tour that rolled out of Indian Motorcycle of Daytona Beach and traveled to Orlando for lunch. A special surprise: Indian motorcycle owners found themselves riding alongside Sean Carroll, a veteran Marine rider from last year’s inaugural Veterans Charity Ride who was piloting his new custom Indian Scout Trike built by Champion Trikes and further customized by Lloydz Motor Workz.

In a final celebration of a very special Daytona Bike Week, Indian Motorcycle hosted a ‘Celebration of the 75th’ at Boot Hill Saloon. Fans who filled the venue were surrounded by Indian motorcycles on display, saw builder Len Edmondson make a public appearance with his Frontier 111 Springfield in person, and got up-close to Texas-based customizers Krystal Hess and Nick Jaquez as they showcased their submissions for the IndianMotorcycles.net ‘Guy vs. Girl Indian Scout Build-off’. After public ballot voting at the Indian Motorcycle display area adjacent to Daytona International Speedway, Hess took a narrow win in the contest with her ‘Sport Scout’ over the ‘Scarlett’ bobber built by Jaquez.

“The history of Indian Motorcycle is part of the very sands of Daytona Beach,” said Reid Wilson, Marketing Director for Indian Motorcycle. “The entire Indian Motorcycle team worked hard to pay tribute to that legend, and to help our newest fans experience the stories and lean into the future of this great brand.”

Learn more about Indian Motorcycle and its activities by visiting IndianMotorcycle.com and Facebook, Twitter and Instagram social media channels.

Harley-Davidson Offers Free Lessons to Those Who Serve

Daytona75DIS

At a venue known for speed – Daytona International Speedway – Harley-Davidson took a moment to slow down and say “thank you,” inviting a group of military personnel and first responders to take an unforgettable ride around the “World Center of Racing” during the 75th Annual Daytona Bike Week.Daytona75DIS2

Now through the end of 2016, all current and former U.S. military, and first responders, including law enforcement officers, firefighters and EMS professionals are invited to learn to ride for free through Harley-Davidson’s Riding Academy program. More information is available at a Harley-Davidson dealer or going to http://www.h-d.com/AmericanHeroes. If Riding Academy is not available in a particular area, qualified participants can still earn a Harley-Davidson Gift Card for the same amount of the enrollment fee for a qualified third-party motorcycle riding course.

“Our offer of free motorcycle training for all U.S. Military and First Responders is all about expressing our appreciation for their service, so they can enjoy more of the freedom they work so hard to protect,” said Dino Bernacchi, Harley-Davidson U.S. Marketing Director. “We’re honored all of these riders joined us today. What a great way to celebrate 75 years at Daytona Bike Week, kick-off riding season, and salute those who help protect everyone’s personal freedom.”
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Escorted by police motorcycles and led by Karen Davidson, great-granddaughter of the company co-founder, the group took an honorary lap around the recently remodeled Speedway track.

After the ride, Harley-Davidson also premiered “Comeback Chapter,” featuring Bradley Sims, a police detective and former Army Reserve Solider and new Harley-Davidson rider. The video features Bradley’s story, and showcases the positive benefits of riding. Check-out the video at http://bit.ly/ComebackChapter.

Guests also were invited to throw a leg over Harley’s 2016 lineup – the most powerful collection of cruisers in the brand’s 113-year history. Harley’s newest bikes – the CVO Pro Street Breakout and the Low Rider S – and the Road Glide Ultra, with its clean sheet design, are ready to demo ride for those itching to roll the throttle of a brand-new bike.

 

Celebrate the 75th Annual Daytona Bike Week With Indian Motorcycle

Jack-Daniels-Indian-AIM-3MINNEAPOLIS, MN – (Feb 22, 2016) – Indian Motorcycle®, America’s first motorcycle company, loves making history at Daytona, whether it’s winning the first Daytona 200 or drawing the best crowds with our Daytona Bike Week events. This year Indian again has a full schedule of events, including demo rides, new models, vintage & custom bike displays, racing, organized rides and much more during the 75th Anniversary of Daytona Bike Week, March 5-12.

“Seventy-five years after Ed Kretz dominated the first Bike Week race, our team is inspired to honor that legacy and showcase our future,” said Steve Menneto, President of Motorcycles for Polaris Industries. “Whether you’re a cruising enthusiast or long-haul tourer, into customs like those shown in our Project Scout contest or a race enthusiast cheering on the SuperHooligan Scout Sixty bikes, we know that anybody hanging out with Indian Motorcycle will have great stories to tell.”

Below are highlights of the Daytona Bike Week action Indian Motorcycle has planned.

Demo Rides at Daytona International Speedway
(International Speedway Blvd., across from the Florida Hospital Gate)
9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Daily; Last Ride Leaves at 4:30 p.m.
Bike Week attendees will have the chance to ride the entire 2016 line-up of Indian motorcycles, including the Indian Scout® Sixty cruiser, Indian Chief® Vintage bagger, Indian Roadmaster® tourer and a very special new model. Ride multiple bikes, compare, and decide which Indian Motorcycle models best suit your riding style. Demo rides are free and available to those with a valid motorcycle endorsement and proper attire.

Indian Motorcycle Display at Daytona International Speedway
(Richard Petty & Midway Blvd.)
9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Daily.
In addition to the demo site at the historic Daytona Speedway, a display in the Midway area will feature the entire 2016 Indian Motorcycle line-up, as well as engine cutaways, custom & vintage bikes, accessories and apparel. Register for your chance to win a 2016 Indian Scout Sixty, check out the finalists from the ‘Project Scout: Build a Legend’ custom contest, see how an Indian Chieftain® with performance accessories handles the dyno, and make sure to pick up an exclusive Indian Motorcycle Daytona 75th patch simply by showing your Indian Motorcycle proof of ownership (key-ring, badge, etc.)

Hooligan Race Night
(Ocean Complex West Parking Lot, downtown Daytona Beach)
7 p.m. – 9 p.m., March 8
Enjoy live music, food & refreshments as Roland Sands and fellow Team RSD racers battle handlebar-to-handlebar in pursuit of the checkered flag on their RSD SuperHooligan Indian Scout Sixty dirt trackers. Winners of the Project Scout contest will be announced at this event, and you’re welcome to join a celebratory after-party at the Boot Hill Saloon.

Indian Motorcycle of Daytona Beach
(290 North Beach Street)
9a.m. – 8p.m., Daily
Visit the dealership in the heart of Daytona Beach for all of your bike, accessory and apparel needs, as well as a variety of special events.

Indian Motorcycle Rider’s Group & Veterans Ride
(Indian Motorcycle of Daytona Beach, 290 North Beach Street)
9 a.m. – 2 p.m., March 10
Owners of Indian motorcycles join veterans from the Veterans Ride program in an organized tour that begins at Indian Motorcycle of Daytona Beach and travels to Orlando for lunch. Owners can roll alongside a Vet rider from last year’s inaugural Veterans Charity Ride as he captains a new custom Indian Trike. Kickstands go up at 10 a.m.

Celebrate The 75th With Indian Motorcycle
(Boot Hill Saloon, 310 Main Street)
6 p.m., March 11
Put a stamp on the end of a legendary week by joining Indian Motorcycle at the Boot Hill Saloon to ‘Celebrate the 75th’.

Visit www.IndianMotorcycle.com/en-us/daytona for the most up to date schedule. Learn more about Indian Motorcycle by visiting IndianMotorcycle.com and Facebook, Twitter and Instagram social media channels.

Editor’s Choice Bike Show At Daytona

editorschoiceAre you going to Daytona Bike Week this year? Well, if you are, you can meet the editors of American Iron Magazine and even win Editor’s Choice at the 2015 Editor’s Choice Bike Show brought to you by J&P Cycles.

The Editor’s Choice will take place at the Broken Spoke Saloon on Tuesday, March 10, with sign ups beginning at 10 am. The awards will be given out at 5 pm.

Find out all of the latest info by going to the official Facebook page by clicking here.