Mustang’s Seat Custom Program: Win Free 1 Year Subscription

Custom-Seat-LandingMustang is now offering custom seats that you can make yourself on their web site from their selection of different stitch patterns, inlay panels, and thread colors. To create your seat, first pick a stitch pattern: Plain, Tuck And Roll, or Diamond. Then chose from their variety of color options. During the custom process, you can also view your seat in better quality by using the provided magnifying glass tool. And just in case your computer’s not color calibrated properly, Mustang can send you a color swatch to confirm the shade and style, as per request. The custom seat option will be introduced on three of their most popular models: Tripper Solo, Tripper Fastback, and DayTripper.

Anyone who orders one of these seats from Mustang will also get a free 1 year subscription from either American Iron Magazine, Motorcycle Bagger, or RoadBike. On top of that, one lucky winner will have their bike (installed with its new Mustang seat) featured in one of these three magazines. Mustang will be posting a custom seat gallery that can serve as inspiration for your own ideas. To make your custom seat now, click here.

Mustang’s Seat Custom Program: Win Free 1 Year Subscription

Custom-Seat-LandingMustang is now offering custom seats that you can make yourself on their web site from their selection of different stitch patterns, inlay panels, and thread colors. To create your seat, first pick a stitch pattern: Plain, Tuck And Roll, or Diamond. Then chose from their variety of color options. During the custom process, you can also view your seat in better quality by using the provided magnifying glass tool. And just in case your computer’s not color calibrated properly, Mustang can send you a color swatch to confirm the shade and style, as per request. The custom seat option will be introduced on three of their most popular models: Tripper Solo, Tripper Fastback, and DayTripper.

Anyone who orders one of these seats from Mustang will also get a free 1 year subscription from either American Iron Magazine, Motorcycle Bagger, or RoadBike. On top of that, one lucky winner will have their bike (installed with its new Mustang seat) featured in one of these three magazines. Mustang will be posting a custom seat gallery that can serve as inspiration for your own ideas. To make your custom seat now, click here.

 

2012 Motorcycle Cannonball, Rolling Through Milwaukee

Buzz made it to Milwaukee on day 3, but not without a few issues. Cannonball Day 3 Recap

With about 3,000 miles ahead of him, repairs and fine tuning were done late into the evening. Hopefully, with a little good luck and support from fellow cannonballers, the ol’ Harley’s dialed in, all gremlins shaken free and it’s smooth riding from this point forward.

Fingers crossed.

For daily Motorcycle Cannonball Updates and News visit: 2012 Motorcycle Cannonball News

Here’s a quick video about Buzz’s 1929 Harley JDH.

What’s It Like To Ride A 1929 Harley? Video

What’s that? You wanna know what its like to ride Buzz’s 1929 Harley JDH Cannonball bike? No problem. Enjoy this video shot from the riders point of view. As you’ll see and hear, the Bike’s running strong, shifting smoothly and looking good. This years Motorcycle Cannonball is just over a week away, looks as though rider, machine and Team American Iron are ready for the challenge.

To pick up your official Team American Iron Cannonball t-shirt, visit: www.GreaseRag.com.

For more info about this years Cannonball, and route details visit: www.Classic-Harley.info.

Old Harleys & Even Older Harleys

A lot of my riding time these days is focused on prepping and getting real-world shakedown miles on my rebuilt 1929 Harley-Davidson JDH before the 3,800-mile coast-to-coast Motorcycle Cannonball in September. But I keep reminding myself what Dale Walksler of Wheels Through Time advised me, “Get the bike running right and then leave it alone. The more miles you put on it before the Motorcycle Cannonball, the sooner you will wear out stuff on the ride.”

I’m occasionally on the various new bikes we have at the office for review, but most of my riding time is on my older bikes. One of my favorites is the blue and white 1936 Harley EL. I have always had a soft spot for Knuckleheads, which is one of the best-looking American motorcycles ever produced. I rode my ’36, which is a first year Knuck that runs as good as it looks, on the first Motorcycle Kickstart Classic last year.

I agreed to show my ’36 at a local high-profile car event and wanted it in the best possible condition — mechanically and cosmetically. The first thing I did was make sure the bike would start and run well as I was planning on riding to the event (we don’t need no stinkin’ trailers!). As expected, it fired right off on the first kick (gotta love that!) and I rode it a few miles to get everything up to operating temperature. Then I rode over to a gas station to top off the gas tanks.

I find many people are attracted to classic motorcycles and like to ask questions about them. And most owners are happy to answer questions about their pride and joy. This was the case at the gas station where a number of people walked over to admire the bike. Two of them asked if they could take photos with their cellphone cameras. One of them, I didn’t catch his name, was obviously fascinated by the bike and admitted he rode a Harley, too. We chatted for a few minutes, and I asked him if he read American Iron Magazine. He said he did, and I told him I’m the editor-in-chief. He stared at me and finally said, “Wait, you’re Buzz?” He told me he thought my bike looked familiar, and said he had just read about the first Motorcycle Kickstart Classic and thought the bike looked great in the photos.

He told me he was a truck driver here in Connecticut and that his subscription to American Iron Magazine had just expired. Meeting me and seeing the Knuck motivated him to resubscribe. I thanked him for his support. His buddy, also a Harley rider, asked me if I was also involved in Motorcycle Bagger, which he subscribed to. I told him we publish three motorcycle magazines — American Iron Magazine, Motorcycle Bagger, and RoadBike — right here in Connecticut.

After a nice visit with these two, I headed back to my house, where I spent the next couple of hours cleaning and prepping the bike for the show. I lubed the chain, checked the tire pressure, adjusted the foot clutch rod, and conditioned the leather bags and saddle, and then I washed and waxed the motor­cycle, top to bottom, front to back. When I was done, the old Knucklehead looked great. I wonder if that is why it rained all that night and into the next morning when I rode it to the show?

Motorcycle Cannonball 2012 & Team American Iron T-Shirt
the first motorcycle cannonball endurance ride was in 2010. Many of our readers told me they wished they could have seen some of the action and ridden along with us. Well, you have another chance in September. We will be riding pre-1930 motorcycles 3,800 miles from New York to San Francisco. See page 122 for the route and dates, or go to
MotorcycleCannonball.com.

I’d like to invite you to be an honorary member of the Team American Iron Support Staff. For $20, you can buy our official T-shirt featuring my 1929 Harley on the front and #15, my competitor’s number, on the back. Please visit GreaseRag.com or call Rosemary at 203/425-8777 x114.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

   
Buzz Kanter
Publisher/Editor-In-Chief

So Many Rides, So Little Time

The winter of 2010-11 was too much for any rider to deal with considering all that snow we had. This winter was quite the opposite in most parts of the US and Canada.  If you have not yet done your first ride safety check, I hope you can soon. At the very least, check the condition of your tires, set the proper air pressure, and inspect your brakes and lights. You should check or change the oil in your engine and transmission. A bit of preventative maintenance goes a long way toward a fun and safe riding season.

We here at the magazine have a few rides planned in the next couple of months and hope you can join us. The first is our Motorcycle Kickstart Classic on May 17 and 18. This is open to the first 100 riders to register and might be sold out by the time you read this. Call Rosemary at 203/425-8777, ext. 114 for details. If you don’t have a kicker or just want to meet up with us, we leave from Wheels Through Time in Maggie Valley, North Carolina, the morning of May 17 and arrive at Cross Roads Harley-Davidson of Wilkesboro, North Carolina, late that afternoon. It will have an open house and bike show for the general public. The next day, we ride to the AMCA Southern Meet in Denton, North Carolina, and will be there for a few days.
A week later, we move north to join thousands of other Harley riders near Washington, DC, for the annual Rolling Thunder event on May 27. Details are still being worked out, but several motorcycle magazines, including American Iron Magazine, will be involved in a special salute to our military services.

The following month, we’ll hit the road for America’s heartland and the annual J&P Cycles Open House in Anamosa, Iowa. This is one of the biggest and best motorcycle events in the heartland states with tens of thousands of motorcyclists joining the fun. On Saturday, June 23, our three magazines (American Iron Magazine, Motorcycle Bagger, and RoadBike) are sponsoring the three custom bike shows (American, bagger, and import), and we will have photo­graphers on hand to shoot bikes for features in our magazines. On Sunday, American Iron Magazine is sponsoring the classic motorcycle show. Our photographers will still be on hand there, too. While in Anamosa, be sure to check out the amazing National Motorcycle Museum just down the road from J&P Cycles. It is a world-class
museum well worth a visit.

American Iron Magazine
As I travel around, I meet a lot of our readers and try to ask as many of them  as possible how we can improve this magazine. No matter what we do here, there is always room for improvement. And who would know better how to improve a magazine than our readers? So please consider this me asking you for ideas on how to make American Iron Magazine better. We really do want to hear from you.

One way to freshen up the magazine is this new design for our editorial columns. I felt the old look was getting a bit stale, so our art directors created a new look and feel. Not a big deal, but we hope you agree it’s an improvement.

Another change, starting with this issue, is a new feature called Object of My Desire. Every issue, we will share something motorcycle-related that a staffer or freelancer desires and why. Because of what we do for a living, we get to see and try a lot of products and services most enthusiasts might not be aware of. This new section allows us to tell you what we like for our own use and why. I’m starting it off with a wonderful seat from Heather’s Leathers, a small American manufacturer you might not have heard about.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz Kanter
Publisher/Editor-In-Chief,
American Iron Magazine