Motorcycle Family

I have owned lots of great bikes, and some not so great

We each discover motorcycles in our own way. Our tastes in specific machines, from specific eras, in specific styles, vary and are likely to change over the years. The café racer imports I was drawn to in college still appeal to me, but not enough to own one. If it wasn’t for my on-track racing accident in 1979, I might never have discovered my passion for antique motorcycles.
Recognizing I would never be a great road racer, and while recovering from a serious crash at the old Bridgehampton, New York, racetrack, I didn't want to give up riding. So, I bought my first antique motorcycle, a British Army BSA M20. Totally foreign—literally and figuratively—to me, I had a steep learning curve with that machine. Next I got my hands on a 1950’s BMW R51/3 and sidecar, and then finally my first antique Harley, an original paint 1924 JDCA, which I still own.

I have owned lots of great bikes, and some not-so-great bikes, in the last 40-plus years. I remember my first handshift motorcycle, an ex-police Shovelhead, on which I almost killed myself learning to ride. The shifting was fine, but that foot clutch was tough to master back in the early 1990s. From there, I mostly rode Harleys and Indians from the 1940s and ’50s. They were old enough to be cool, different, and fun, but new enough to almost be reliable in modern traffic. Almost.

I enjoy motorcycling: the feeling of freedom on the road, the social aspect of riding with friends, the accomplishment of getting and keeping my motorcycle running, and the romance of the older machines.

While I appreciate the convenience and efficiency of a shiny new Harley, Indian, or Victory, my passions run deepest for motorcycles older than me. Okay, I do own one modern Harley, a hot rod XR1200X Sportster, which I love riding.

For many years my interests focused on Knucks, Pans, and Chiefs. I was fortunate enough to have owned and enjoyed a number of them over the years. Then my interests went further back in time when I discovered Indian 101 Scouts and Harley JDs from the 1920s. Primitive, total-loss lubrication, dangerous clincher tires, and virtually no brakes; these machines take time and many miles to understand and keep on the road. But they sure are fun!

In 2009, my pal Dale Walksler called me. He told me about an up-coming ride called the Motor­cycle Cannonball. He said it was open to 1915 and older bikes to ride across the US as an endurance run. I’d never owned or ridden anything that old. Sourcing parts, building, and riding my 1915 Harley twin on that event opened a whole new world of amazing machines and people to me.

Thanks to many friends, including Dave Fusiak, Dale Walksler, Fred Lange, and others for sharing your knowledge with me on that ride of a lifetime.

It doesn’t matter what you ride—old or new, stock or custom—you are a member of the motorcycle family.

We’d love to hear about how you got into motorcycles and what your two-wheeled passions are these days. More than just another bike rag, we want American Iron Magazine to be your magazine, and we can’t do that without your participation.

I’ve shared my story here, and I want to hear yours. Please send your story and photos to [email protected] or post them on our Facebook page.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Kickstart Classic Harley Motorcycle Magazine Ride

We at American Iron Harley Magazine are teaming up with RoadBike motorcycle cruising magazine and the folks at Wheels Through Time, Panhead City and Barber Motorsports to put on the 1st Kickstart Classic motorcycle ride in October and you are invited.

AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Breakfast – Erik Buell

Every year the AMA holds this breakfast in Daytona during Bike Week and I am surprised at how few people are even aware of this fund raising event open to the public. This year it was held on Friday at the swanky 500 Club facility in the infield of the Daytona International Speedway track. The guest speaker was Erik Buell who gave a wonderful recounting of his history with motorcycles, racing and Harley-Davidson. He also unveiled his stunning and technologically leading new street motorcycle. It is limited to a 100 bike production worldwide.

Harley Baggers In Daytona Beach

Every year I have seen a greater number of Harley baggers come to Daytona Beach for Bike Week and this year there are more than ever. I am seeing fewer choppers with fat rear tires and long forks. They are just fading off the scene as the Harley baggers continue to grow in popularity here.

Daytona Bike Week: What Motorcycle Gear To Pack?

I got pretty much every year to the Daytona Beach Bike Week to cover the activities for American Iron Magazine and the Harley enthusiasts who can’t attend. Yet when it comes time to pack my stuff it is odd to be in freezing New England trying to figure out what to bring to sunny and warm Florida.

Harley Garage Time & Daytona Harley Baggers Party

Motorcycle Bagger Harley magazine Launch Party and Bike Show
March is right around the corner, and that means the annual Daytona Beach Bike Week party is almost here. This event is fun every year, but we want this one to be something special. In conjunction with celebrating our 22nd birthday here at American Iron Magazine, we’re expanding our most popular special issue magazine ever — American Iron Motorcycle Bagger — to a bimonthly publication in March.

Buzz’s Freezing Classic Motorcycle Ride Video

After not riding or even starting a motorcycle in over a month I finally got my driveway free of ice and snow and pushed my 1931 Indian 101 Scout motorcycle out of the garage into the 18 degree temperature Sunday morning. My pal Charlie was due at my house on one of his motorcycles for us to do a freezing Sunday morning breakfast ride.

Border Bankruptcy – Fewer Harley Magazine Sales

A lot of Harley magazine sales come from book stores, especially for the smaller circulation motorcycle magazines. After weeks of rumors about the financial condition of Borders Bookstores, we heard today that Borders (and Waldenbooks, which it owns) has filed for bankruptcy.

New Harley Baggers Magazine

Our new Motorcycle Bagger will feature the same high quality editorial, art and printing as American Iron Magazine with reivews, tech and installs plus tours and great places to ride your Harley baggers to.

Harley Riders Improve American Iron Magazine

After more than twenty years of publication, we think American Iron Magazine is good magazine for Harley riders. More people buy American Iron Magazine than any other Harley magazine in the world. But we also know there are always ways to make it even better. So every year we ask our readers to tell us what you think about what we print every month.

Another Sunday Morning Motorcycle Ride?

This past Sunday morning, my riding partner and neighbor, Dean, rode over on his trusty 1959 Panhead. He wanted to show me his recently purchased, correct, and original bubble bags. The sun had just come up and the temperature was climbing out of the high 30s. I was bundled up for the cold when I fired up my trusty old 1931 Indian 101 Scout. While it had been more than a month since I had last rode this old Indian, it is a bike I have ridden a lot over the years and is one of my favorites.