Indian Motorcycle Announces the PowerPlus, the Most Powerful Engine in its Class

Indian Motorcycle unveils its most powerful engine to date: The PowerPlus. The all-new 108 cubic inch, liquid-cooled, V-twin engine delivers a class-leading 122 horsepower and 128 ft-lbs. of torque.*

The PowerPlus will power an upcoming model, an all-new, fixed-fairing bagger that utilizes Indian Motorcycle’s state-of-the-art technology to become the highest-performing American V-twin ever developed. The new engine’s name is a nod to Indian Motorcycle’s iconic history, paying homage to the Indian PowerPlus motorcycle produced from 1916 to 1924.

“We challenge our engineers with the notion that anything less than best-in-class design and performance will simply not get it done, and it’s clear with this new engine that they have delivered on that high standard,” said Steve Menneto, Indian Motorcycle President. “Countless hours were spent in design, development, and testing to ensure this is the best liquid-cooled V-twin ever developed, and I could not be prouder of our team and this incredible motor.”

Indian Motorcycle PowerPlus Engine Specifications:

  • Engine Displacement: 108 cubic inches (1769cc)
  • Power: 122 hp at 5,500 RPM
  • Torque: 128 ft-lbs at 3,800 RPM
  • Maximum Engine Speed: 6,500 RPM
  • Architecture: 60-degree V-twin, liquid-cooled powerplant
  • Crankcase: Unit design featuring a high capacity semi-dry sump oil system
  • Timing System: Overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder
  • Fuel System: Electronic fuel injection. 52mm dual bore throttle bodies
  • Compression Ratio: 11:1
  • Transmission: Six-speed with true overdrive, constant mesh
  • Clutch: Assist clutch

The PowerPlus will be built in Osceola, Wisconsin, with final motorcycle assembly taking place in Indian Motorcycle’s production facility in Spirit Lake, Iowa. Riders can learn more at IndianMotorcycle.com.

*PLEASE NOTE

Indian Motorcycle’s advertised power output of the new PowerPlus engine is stated to be 122 hp and 128 ft-lbs. These are engine dyno numbers, not rear wheel figures. American Iron Magazine is awaiting a test bike to evaluate actual rear wheel power numbers. Stay Tuned!